Gov. Napolitano should recommend creation of separate department to deal with Mexico’s escalating violent impact on U.S. security

LatinaLista — While doubts still linger over whether or not Arizona Governor Janet Napolitano is the right choice to lead the Department of Homeland Security, one fact that was made abundantly clear in today’s confirmation hearing of her nomination was that she will have her hands full.

Homeland Security Secretary-designate Janet Napolitano, left, is greeted on Capitol Hill by Senate Homeland Security and Government Affairs Committee Chairman Sen. Joseph Lieberman, right, and the committee’s ranking Republican Sen. Susan Collins, prior to testifying before the committee’s hearing on her nomination.
(Source: Kevin Wolf/Associated Press)

From worrying about where to house Katrina evacuees whose trailer housing comes due in March to thwarting any national cyber attacks to being on the lookout for terrorists at the nation’s airports to preventing any biological weapons from being launched on the public to, of course, enforcing immigration laws and overseeing border security.
Yet, given the deteriorating conditions in Mexico, it’s time that a separate department dealing only with Mexico and the United States be formed before what’s happening south of the border finds its way into this country on a more prevalent scale.


There’s no doubt that Governor Napolitano knows what she’s in for. Her opening remarks today revealed that she is aware of the scope of the position.
But given the fact that she has been so busy preparing for this hearing and getting things settled in Arizona before she leaves and finding a place to live in DC, she may not be aware of just how much the situation is spiraling out of control in Mexico.
It’s so bad that citizen vigilante groups are springing up in Juarez, Mexico. Claiming to be funded by local businesspeople fed up with the violence, they vow to kill a criminal every 24 hours.
Things are seen to be so bad in Mexico that a “Joint Operating Environment” (JOE 2008) report issued by the U.S. Joint Forces Command on global security threats predicted that if the level of violence continues in Mexico and the amount of corruption is allowed to increase and pervade all branches of the government and law enforcement, the end result could be that the state of Mexico has a “rapid and sudden collapse.”

The Mexican possibility may seem less likely, but the government, its politicians, police, and judicial infrastructure are all under sustained assault and pressure by criminal gangs and drug cartels. How that internal conflict turns out over the next several years will have a major impact on the stability of the Mexican state. Any descent by Mexico into chaos would demand an American response based on the serious implications for homeland security alone.

Most people agree with the findings of the U.S. Joint Forces Command. A poll conducted on the El Paso Times website asking people if they thought Mexico could collapse in 2009 had 63 percent of the respondents agreeing with the statement that the drug lords were taking over the country.
Unless something major happens in Mexico to get a handle on this violence, it is reasonable to assume that it will continue on its course and probably fulfill the predictions made about it. That Mexico won’t be able to contain the violence within its own borders is also a reasonable assumption.
For that reason, it’s imperative now that the Obama administration create a separate department, outside of the Department of Homeland Security, to address only the issue of Mexico and how to help their government combat the escalating violence.
It is that important and has the potential to directly impact the safety of Americans that it goes beyond what is being done to prevent terrorist attacks on U.S. soil.
If Governor Napolitano really understood the implications of what is happening in Mexico, she would make it a priority to recommend to the President-elect that he create this special department.
Time is not on our side.

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8 Comments

  1. Liquidmicro said:

    “It’s so bad that citizen vigilante groups are springing up in Juarez, Mexico. Claiming to be funded by local businesspeople fed up with the violence, they vow to kill a criminal every 24 hours.’
    This should have been done long ago. Let the people take back what is rightfully theirs. Let them send the message to the criminal element in Mexico and let the Government know that they could be next if things don’t begin improving there.

  2. Texano78704 said:

    The situation is so serious, that the El Paso city council voted unanimously to ask the federal government to seriously study the legalization of narcotics.
    Former “war on drugs” anti-drug czar general Mccaffrey has said that México is on the verge of becoming a narco-state.
    So, yeah, I am right there with you in saying that there needs to be a special effort in dealing with the international effects of this country’s drug habits.
    To absurdly suggest that some vigilantes will resolve this problem on a local level is rather naive. Vigilante justice is not justice and will not be any more effective against well financed drug cartels than the local police. They actually tried something like this in Colombia and created a cure that was worse than the disease.

  3. Horace said:

    Marisa’s solution for every problem; establishing a new bureaucracy and raise taxes for citizens to pay for it. Marisa, this would be a State Department, not a DHS issue. Mexico is a sovereign state, so I seriously doubt that it would accept any interference from our government. They’d just want us to give their corrupt government money so their officials could take a cut. You really have no idea what you’re talking about, as is the case for so many other issues you take on. Take some history lessons, some law classes, international relations courses and learn how our government is set up to interact with others. You’d probably wouldn’t be making such absurd suggestions if you did.

  4. Liquidmicro said:

    “To absurdly suggest that some vigilantes will resolve this problem on a local level is rather naive.”
    I said, “let the PEOPLE take back what is rightfully theirs”, I did not say ‘some vigilantes’. You have tried to narrow my statement for your own naive reason.
    If the PEOPLE do nothing, then why the patronization??, and since you seem to think you have a much better idea, lets here it.
    Personally, I prefer to send our military in there and wipe out all the drug cartels and their people, simple and effective. But, alas, there are other unintended consequences that come with this as well.
    So I ask again, whats wrong with the PEOPLE taking a stand for themselves and for their own country??

  5. Texano78704 said:

    I said, “let the PEOPLE take back what is rightfully theirs”, I did not say ‘some vigilantes’. You have tried to narrow my statement for your own naive reason.
    I did it for a realist reason. Unarmed residents who have no reason to believe that they have the backing of the local constabulary will not go up against the well armed drug cartel. Obviously your response was based in idealism, not what would likely occur.
    Personally, I prefer to send our military in there and wipe out all the drug cartels and their people, simple and effective.
    As simple and effective as was done in Afghanistan and Iraq? The US invasion of Afghanistan has created a narco state. Iraq still has about four million internally and externally displaced refugees.

  6. Liquidmicro said:

    Obviously your response was based in idealism, not what would likely occur.
    And why would it not be likely to occur?? Business men are attempting to stand up, some of the peoples are beginning to see it as well. If they are not armed with weapons, they could use pitchforks, etc. They have revolted in the past, whats keeping them from doing it now? Let them stand up for their country, for that they would get respect from those that wish to oppress them in their homelands.
    As simple and effective as was done in Afghanistan and Iraq? The US invasion of Afghanistan has created a narco state. Iraq still has about four million internally and externally displaced refugees.
    As I stated, unintended consequences come with a military incursion.

  7. Texano78704 said:

    And why would it not be likely to occur??
    Why not expend some effort explaining that it is probable and not that it is possible? Quit blowing smoke.
    They have revolted in the past, whats keeping them from doing it now? Let them stand up for their country, for that they would get respect from those that wish to oppress them in their homelands.
    Yeah, yeah… the peasants are revolting… against an armed and organized drug cartel with far more financial resources than the city of Juárez can muster, thanks in large part to the US black market in illegal drugs and illegal weapons.

  8. Sandra said:

    There you go again blaming the U.S. for these people not having any backbone to stay and fight for their own country. BOTH the suppliers and users of drugs are to blame. What has that to do with illegal immigration? They aren’t coming here to escape the drug cartels.

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