Great Plains articles

Joseph-Harp-image

Prison Meds Reveal Disorders Severe for Mentally Ill Inmates

Prison Meds Reveal Disorders Severe for Mentally Ill Inmates

By Clifton Adcock and Shaun Hittle Oklahoma Watch LEXINGTON, Oklahoma — Two times a day, seven days a week, hundreds of prisoners at Joseph Harp Correctional Center in Lexington break into four lines to receive medications from prison staff. There is Thorazine and Geodon for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, Wellbutrin for depression and Trilafon for

Prisons

Oklahoma Weighs Moving More Inmates to Private Prisons, Or Buying a Private Prison

By Clifton Adcock Oklahoma Watch The Oklahoma Board of Corrections is looking at three options to deal with overcrowding at the state’s prison facilities: expanding public prisons, contracting for more private-prison beds, and buying or leasing one of the state’s two empty private prisons. At its Thursday meeting, the board approved a measure allowing the

Charity-Care-Photo-1-771x618

Oklahoma Hospitals Spend Small Fractions of Revenue on Charity Care

By Clifton Adcock Oklahoma Watch Despite a congressman’s recent assurance that many hospitals “do the work for free,” Oklahoma’s hospitals spend less than 3 percent of their net patient revenues on charity care on average, records show. During a town hall meeting last month, Second District Congressman Markwayne Mullin, R-Okla., assured callers worried about the

police-badge-660

Sex Crimes Are Most Common Reason Oklahoma Police Lose Certification

By Shaun Hittle Oklahoma Watch More than a quarter of Oklahoma peace officers who were disciplined by the state’s certification agency or surrendered their certifications over three years were convicted of or pleaded guilty to sex crimes, according to records analyzed by Oklahoma Watch. From 2010 to 2012, 66 officers had their certifications revoked or

14927478_BG1

Unlike Nation, Oklahoma Is Failing to Reduce Drunken-Driving Deaths

By Shaun Hittle Oklahoma Watch During most of the past two decades, the annual number of alcohol-related traffic deaths across the country has fallen by about 20 percent, to more than 11,500. More stringent drunken driving laws, widespread public education campaigns and safer vehicles have all played a role in that sharp reduction. In Oklahoma,

InsidePrisonCellPhoto1

Justice Reforms: A Tale of Two States

By Shaun Hittle Oklahoma Watch Several years ago, legislators in both Oklahoma and North Carolina began taking steps to address rising incarceration rates. The number of incarcerated offenders in Oklahoma had increased by a few thousand inmates in the past decade, giving the state one of the highest rates of imprisonment in the nation. The

Top