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Latina Lista: News from the Latinx perspective > Government > Does Arizona News Station Cross the Line of Responsible Journalism by Airing a Story it was Fed?

Does Arizona News Station Cross the Line of Responsible Journalism by Airing a Story it was Fed?

LatinaLista — Tucson television station KOLD News 13 had a scoop that couldn’t be ignored – but then again, maybe it should have been.
Or at the least, reported in a style more becoming of a news organization and less like paparazzi salivating over a celebrity.
The story was about a security alert in Southern Arizona issued by the FBI and outlining a possible threat directed at Fort Huachuca.

The only trouble is the news report is based on a document that was 6 months old and by the FBI’s own admission was something that was never “completely evaluated.”
So, what is a news organization doing disseminating information when they don’t have all the facts?


Obviously, they’re going after ratings.
The news report (using the word report loosely in this case) was centered on an alert document that the FBI gave to local law enforcement.

The document gives no timetable or explanation of how the threat will be carried out. But does say, “a group of Iraqis may have entered the United States through tunnels from Mexico into Arizona,” and those same “Iraqis are believed to be the ones who will perpetrate the attack on Fort Huachuca.”

The news station further reported that the document said the Iraqis could be hiding out on an “unidentified Indian reservation” in Arizona. With that little bit of confirmation, the news reporters speculated on which Indian reservation it could be, naming the Tohono O’odham Nation reservation in the news report though they never had that information to begin with.
In addition, all the officials, other than the FBI, that the reporters approached regarding the alert and/or the document, no one outrightly confirmed it.

Lt. Col. Garner says, “We operate within that knowing that we are always a target, and then we take all precautions necessary whether it’s a general threat or a specific threat like the one you’re talking about.”
One former Congressman, who asked not to be identified for this report, said the document seems “dubious” and “without merit.” Not only that, it’s dated May 14th, 2007.

Yet, the reporters continued their pursuit of — the truth? Hardly. Next would be the stunned and scared reactions of local townspeople to news that something like this could be happening, literally, underfoot.

“I don’t know why we haven’t heard about it sooner, according to Gresham.””It’s pretty scary, our kids are here. This is where we live.”
Bevill says, “If this is being kept confidential, something so close to here, I think this of more importance than what we’re doing in Iraq. Seems like the kind of information that would benefit everybody here.”

Exactly!
So why aren’t more news stations reporting on this?
Because it’s only enough news to cause anxious feelings and more resentment towards our southern neighbor — it’s not enough news to make it true.
In these times where vigilance is the wisest course of action for anyone to take, news organizations have the greater responsibility to be vigilant themselves and not fall willful party to publicizing news that has no merit other than to create an atmosphere of fear and mistrust.

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Comment(16)

  • Avatar
    Horace
    November 16, 2007 at 6:32 pm

    Why should this disturb you, Marisa. It is a highly probable scenario to have terrorists coming into this country under cover of illegal immigrants, after all, we receive drug smugglers, murderers, rapists and gang members by illegal entry through our borders, as much as we receive those who come for legitmate work. Is this new possibility just another one of those inconvenient truths that you’d like to be ignored because it might reflect negatively on your open borders concept?

  • Avatar
    Horace
    November 16, 2007 at 6:36 pm

    One more thing. I consider the murders, rapists, thieves, and gang members other types of terrorists, because they have one thing in common with the common garden variety, they induce fear in our country. All should be identified, arrested, incarcerated and then deported.

  • Avatar
    yave begnet
    November 16, 2007 at 8:43 pm

    I guess this is going to put a dent in our (so far unkept) promise to the people of Iraq to permit more Iraqi refugees to come to the U.S. Give me your tired, your poor, your huddled–psych!
    Here we see the real reason the Iraqi resettlement program has so miserably failed–not because of logistical difficulties, as the DOS claims, but because the government wets its pants at the thought of more of our Iraqi ‘brothers and sisters in freedom’ actually coming to the U.S.
    we receive drug smugglers, murderers, rapists and gang members by illegal entry through our borders
    We grow a few of those right here at home, too.
    Again we see elements of the media working hand in hand with the Bush administration. It’s a win-win-lose situation: ratings go up, Bush gets a free hand with a cowed populace, and the American people lose otra vez.

  • Avatar
    Horace
    November 16, 2007 at 9:27 pm

    I rest my case, 5 Mexican illegal aliens who would otherwise terrorize our communities with their violent behavior were recently arrested, and this is only the tip of the iceberg. What is the difference between the actions of Islamic radicals and such people?
    Background checks lead to arrests of 6
    RYN GARGULINSKI
    Tucson Citizen
    Six men – four of them with felony convictions – have been arrested at or near the border since Thursday after routine background checks, according to a news release from U.S. Customs and Border Protection.
    Five of those arrested were Mexican nationals.
    The first arrested was Mexican national Jose Arceo-Vasquez, 45, who was stopped near Sells on Thursday, the release said. Once processed at the Casa Grande Border Patrol station, agents found he had four convictions in Los Angeles, the release said.
    They include accessory to murder in 1988, felon in possession of a firearm in 1996 and two from last year, burglary and grand theft.
    U.S. citizen Manuel Sanchez, 41, was arrested Friday after he was stopped while allegedly trying to smuggle 350 pounds of marijuana into the U.S., the release said.
    Sanchez’s background check at the Nogales Border Patrol station turned up a conviction for burglary in Chandler in 1984 and kidnapping in Globe in 1993, the release said.
    Also Friday, a Mexican national with two Los Angeles warrants for his arrest on drug charges was taken into custody at the Naco Border Patrol Station.
    Because he has not been convicted , the 37-year-old’s name was not released.
    A 32-year-old Mexican national, whose name was not released, was arrested Saturday when a background check at the Nogales station revealed he was the principal subject in a homicide investigation in Phoenix, the release said.
    Two more Mexican nationals were arrested Monday, the release said.
    Fernando Pech-Salzar, 39, and David Morales Castillo, 22, were taken to the Tucson Border Patrol station, where their criminal histories were discovered, the release said.
    Pech-Salzar had been convicted of lewd and lascivious acts with a child under 14 years of age by force in California in 1994 and re-entry by an aggravated felon when he tried to illegally enter the Unites States in 2002.
    Morales Castillo’s record showed a second-degree murder conviction in New York in 2005.
    The release said all of the men are in custody until they are prosecuted or extradited.
    Six men – four of them with felony convictions – have been arrested at or near the border since Thursday after routine background checks, according to a news release from U.S. Customs and Border Protection.
    Five of those arrested were Mexican nationals.

  • Avatar
    Horace
    November 16, 2007 at 9:33 pm

    “We grow a few of those right here at home, too.”
    So, yeve, we should invite more by leaving our borders unsecured? Such logic is why your side is losing ground. Only a fence or increasing our vigilence at our borders will serve as deterrence to these people. An amnesty or jobs program won’t work, as these people wouldn’t be interested. Borders would still mean nothing to them.

  • Avatar
    Horace
    November 16, 2007 at 9:47 pm

    “Here we see the real reason the Iraqi resettlement program has so miserably failed–not because of logistical difficulties, as the DOS claims, but because the government wets its pants at the thought of more of our Iraqi ‘brothers and sisters in freedom’ actually coming to the U.S.”
    Gee, that’s just what we need, yeve, brothers and sisters who are in the middle of a civil war, whose mindset is purely tribal, and prone to taking to violence to solve their issues. Moreover, we see the affects of tribalism in England every day, where Pakistanis resort to Sharia law to punish their own. We hear of wives beaten, daughters murdered or mutilated, all because they transgress religious laws or bring shame upon their families by breaking with tradition. I won’t go so far as calling you an idiot, yeve, but your nievete on most issues makes you one of the most pathetic people I’ve followed across these blogs. There are many ethnic groups where assimilation fails to take. Look at France, where Moslems remain isolatated within their communities and have taken to the streets in fits of mayhem and destruction of property. Your nieve belief that all cultures will come to a happy equilibrium after coming here is plain ignorant.

  • Avatar
    Frank
    November 17, 2007 at 7:52 am

    Well stated, Horace!

  • Avatar
    yave begnet
    November 17, 2007 at 10:09 am

    I won’t go so far as calling you an idiot, yeve
    Thank god, I don’t know how I would recover from that.

  • Avatar
    Horace
    November 17, 2007 at 8:26 pm

    We all know how sensitive you are yeve, but I’ll say it anyway, you’re an idiot. Now go sulk in a corner. Where should I send the flowers?

  • Avatar
    dave
    November 18, 2007 at 9:11 am

    Lets just do background checks on all people crossing the border. then the world will be safer.I live in Nogales and yes Mexican Nationals have criminals coming in and out all the time, Does anyone hold Canadians as criminals as well?Does anyone know that Canadian police have busted 22 terror plots since 9-11? There are more border agents here in Nogales than the entire Canadian border which is 4000 miles long. Next time one of you hears the phrase protecting the border understand that is a lie and we are fools to believe our government.

  • Avatar
    charles
    November 18, 2007 at 2:36 pm

    JEEZ! Horace, you hisoues bigoted moron, don’t you have anything to do other than hassle people of color. why don’t you go back under the slimey roack you crawled out of. or better yet, why don’t you move to an all-white country? you’d be happier, the people her would be happier. knowing you only from your hideous posts here, you are a miserable human being. i wish i could pity you, but it’s your own choice.

  • Avatar
    Frank
    November 18, 2007 at 3:25 pm

    Hassle people of color? What has skin color to do with being opposed to illegal immigration because it is against the law? Illegals come in all skin colors including White skin. Nice try race card puller, but no cigar.

  • Avatar
    Horace
    November 18, 2007 at 5:17 pm

    Charles, does that mean that our date is off?

  • Avatar
    laura
    November 18, 2007 at 9:01 pm

    My friends, why not stick to the facts ? The facts are that immigrants commit less violent crimes than native-born citizens.
    Some excerpts from a statement dated 7/2/2007 of the undersigned jurists and sociologists:
    One of the most pervasive misperceptions about immigrants is that they are more likely to commit predatory crimes than are the native-born. Popular movies, television series, and a sensationalizing news media propagate the enduring image of immigrant communities permeated by crime and violence. But this widespread belief is simply wrong.
    Numerous studies by independent researchers and government commissions over the past 100 years repeatedly and consistently have found that, in fact, immigrants are less likely to commit crimes or to be behind bars than are the native-born. This is true for the nation as a whole, as well as for cities with large immigrant populations such as Los Angeles, New York, Chicago, and Miami, and cities along the U.S.-Mexico border such as San Diego and El Paso.
    Immigrants in every ethnic group in the United States have lower rates of crime and imprisonment than do the native born. This is true for all immigrant groups ­- including the Mexicans, Salvadorans, and Guatemalans who comprise most of the undocumented immigrants in the country. Even though immigrants from these countries are far more likely than natives to have less than a high-school education and to live in poverty, they are far less likely to be behind bars or to commit crimes. Moreover, teenage immigrants are much less likely than native-born adolescents to engage in risk behaviors such as delinquency, violence, and substance abuse that often lead to imprisonment.
    Signatories:
    Richard D. Alba
    The University at Albany, State University of New York
    Distinguished Professor of Sociology and Public Policy
    Sarah Babb
    Boston College
    Associate Professor of Sociology
    Stanley R. Bailey
    University of California, Irvine
    Assistant Professor of Sociology
    Susan Benesch
    Georgetown University Law Center
    Fellow, Center for Applied Legal Studies
    Ann Benson
    Immigration Project, Washington Defender Association
    Directing Attorney
    Irene Bloemraad
    University of California, Berkeley
    Assistant Professor of Sociology
    Kitty Calavita
    University of California, Irvine
    Professor of Criminology, Law and Society
    Patrick J. Carr
    Rutgers University
    Assistant Professor of Sociology
    Miguel Ceballos
    University of Nebraska, Lincoln
    Assistant Professor of Sociology and Ethnic Studies
    Jorge Chapa
    University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
    Professor of Sociology and Director, Center on Democracy in a Multiracial Society
    Leo R. Chávez
    University of California, Irvine
    Professor of Anthropology
    Linda Chavez
    One Nation Indivisible
    President
    David Cook-Martín
    Grinnell College
    Assistant Professor of Sociology
    G. David Curry
    University of Missouri-St. Louis
    Professor of Criminology & Criminal Justice
    Cynthia García Coll
    Brown University
    Charles Pitt Robinson and John Palmer Barstow Professor of Education, Psychology and Pediatrics
    Wayne A. Cornelius
    University of California, San Diego
    Theodore Gildred Distinguished Professor of Political Science and U.S.-Mexican Relations, and Director, Center for Comparative Immigration Studies
    Mark E. Courtney
    University of Chicago
    McCormick Tribune Professor of Social Service Administration, and Past Director, Chapin Hall Center for Children
    Pawan Dhingra
    Oberlin College
    Associate Professor of Sociology and Comparative American Studies
    Cynthia Duarte
    Quinnipiac University
    Assistant Professor of Sociology
    Finn Esbensen
    University of Missouri-St. Louis
    E. Desmond Lee Chair in Youth Crime and Violence, and Professor of Criminology and Criminal Justice
    Walter A. Ewing
    Immigration Policy Center, American Immigration Law Foundation
    Research Associate
    Joe R. Feagin
    Texas A&M University
    Professor of Sociology and Past President, American Sociological Association
    Lynne R. Feldman
    University of Illinois College of Law
    Adjunct Professor
    Katherine Fennelly
    University of Minnesota
    Professor and Fesler-Lampert Chair in Urban and Regional Affairs
    Nancy Foner
    Hunter College and Graduate Center, City University of New York
    Distinguished Professor of Sociology
    Bill Form
    Ohio State University
    Professor Emeritus of Sociology
    Reanne Frank
    Ohio State University
    Assistant Professor of Sociology
    Brian Fry
    Indiana Wesleyan University
    Associate Professor of Sociology
    Andrew J. Fuligni
    University of California, Los Angeles
    Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
    Elizabeth Fussell
    Tulane University
    Assistant Professor of Sociology
    Roberta Garner
    DePaul University
    Professor and Chair of Sociology
    Tanya Golash-Boza
    University of Kansas
    Assistant Professor of Sociology and American Studies
    William A. Gamson
    Boston College
    Past President, American Sociological Association
    Herbert J Gans
    Columbia University
    Robert S. Lynd Professor of Sociology, and Past President, American Sociological Association
    Paul S. Gray
    Boston College
    Associate Professor of Sociology
    John Hagan
    Northwestern University
    John D. MacArthur Professor of Sociology and Law; Senior Research Fellow, American Bar Foundation, and Editor of Annual Review of Law & Social Science
    Marilyn Halter
    Boston University
    Professor of History and Director, American & New England Studies Program Research Associate, Institute on Culture, Religion and World Affairs
    Douglas Hartmann
    University of Minnesota
    Associate Professor of Sociology
    Angela J. Hattery
    Wake Forest University
    Zachary T. Smith Reynolds Associate Professor of Sociology and Women & Gender Studies
    Bruce D. Haynes
    University of California, Davis
    Associate Professor of Sociology
    Bill Ong Hing
    University of California, Davis
    Professor of Law
    Julie Horney
    The University at Albany, State University of New York
    Dean and Professor, School of Criminal Justice
    Jennifer L. Hochschild
    Harvard University
    Henry LaBarre Jayne Professor of Government, Professor of African and African American Studies, and Harvard College Professor
    Jennifer Holdaway, Ph.D.
    Social Science Research Council
    Program Officer, International Migration Program
    Michael Hout
    University of California, Berkeley
    Professor of Sociology and Demography
    C. Ronald Huff
    University of California, Irvine
    Dean, School of Social Ecology, and Professor of Criminology, Law and Society
    Charles Jaret
    Georgia State University
    Professor of Sociology
    Paul Jesilow
    University of California, Irvine
    Associate Professor of Criminology, Law and Society
    Tomás R. Jiménez
    University of California, San Diego
    Assistant Professor of Sociology
    Benjamin E. Johnson
    American Immigration Law Foundation
    Executive Director
    Susanne Jonas
    University of California, Santa Cruz
    Professor of Latin American and Latino Studies
    Arne L. Kalleberg
    University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
    Kenan Distinguished Professor of Sociology, and President-Elect, American Sociological Association
    Daniel Kanstroom
    Boston College Law School
    Professor and Director of Human Rights Program
    Philip Kasinitz
    Hunter College and Graduate Center, City University of New York
    Professor of Sociology, and Past President, Eastern Sociological Society
    Robert Kaufman
    Ohio State University
    Professor of Sociology
    Nazli Kibria
    Boston University
    Associate Professor of Sociology
    Caitlin Killian
    Drew University
    Associate Professor of Sociology
    Dae Young Kim
    University of Maryland, College Park
    Assistant Professor of Sociology and Asian American Studies
    Peter Kivisto
    Augustana College
    Richard Swanson Professor of Social Thought and Chair of Sociology
    Fred Kniss
    Loyola University, Chicago
    Professor and Chair of Sociology
    Daniel M. Kowalski
    Editor-in-Chief, Bender’s Immigration Bulletin
    Lauren J. Krivo
    Ohio State University
    Professor of Sociology
    Gary LaFree
    University of Maryland, College Park
    Professor of Criminology and Criminal Justice
    Ralph W. Larkin
    John Jay College of Criminal Justice, City University of New York
    Senior Research Associate
    Janet L. Lauritsen
    University of Missouri-St. Louis
    Professor of Criminology & Criminal Justice
    Sylvia R. Lazos
    University of Nevada, Las Vegas, William S. Boyd School of Law
    Justice Myron Leavitt Professor of Law
    Ivan Light
    University of California, Los Angeles
    Professor of Sociology
    April Linton
    University of California, San Diego
    Assistant Professor of Sociology
    Lyn H. Lofland
    University of California, Davis
    Professor of Sociology
    Scott M. Lynch
    Princeton University
    Associate Professor of Sociology
    Theo Majka
    University of Dayton
    Professor of Sociology
    Ramiro Martínez, Jr.
    Florida International University
    Professor of Criminal Justice
    Helen B. Marrow
    Harvard University
    Co-editor, The New Americans: A Guide to Immigration Since 1965
    Douglas S. Massey
    Princeton University
    Henry G. Bryant Professor of Sociology and Public Affairs; President, American Academy of Political and Social Science, and Past President, American Sociological Association,
    Monica McDermott
    Stanford University
    Assistant Professor of Sociology
    Sara S. McLanahan
    Princeton University
    William S. Tod Professor of Sociology and Public Affairs
    M. Isabel Medina
    Loyola University, New Orleans, College of Law
    Ferris Family Professor of Law
    Cecilia Menjívar
    Arizona State University
    Associate Professor of Sociology
    Vanessa Merton
    Pace University School of Law
    Professor of Law and Faculty Supervisor, Immigration Justice Clinic, John Jay Legal Services, Inc.
    Jon’a Meyer
    Rutgers University
    Associate Professor of Criminology
    Jody Miller
    University of Missouri-St. Louis
    Associate Professor of Sociology
    Teresa A. Miller
    The University at Buffalo School of Law, State University of New York
    Professor of Law
    Joya Misra
    University of Massachusetts
    Associate Professor of Sociology and Public Policy
    John H. Mollenkopf
    City University of New York, Graduate Center
    Distinguished Professor of Political Science and Sociology and Director of the Center for Urban Research
    Jeylan T. Mortimer
    University of Minnesota
    Professor of Sociology
    Nancy A. Naples
    University of Connecticut
    Professor of Sociology and Women’s Studies
    Katherine S. Newman
    Princeton University
    Forbes ’41 Professor of Sociology and Public Affairs
    Dina G. Okamoto
    University of California, Davis
    Assistant Professor of Sociology
    Michael A. Olivas
    University of Houston Law Center
    William B. Bates Distinguished Chair of Law, and Director, Institute of Higher Education Law and Governance
    D. Wayne Osgood
    The Pennsylvania State University
    Professor, Crime, Law and Justice Program
    Nancy K. Ota
    Albany Law School
    Professor of Law
    Sarah Paoletti
    University of Pennsylvania Law School
    Clinical Supervisor and Lecturer, Transnational Legal Clinic
    Karen F. Parker
    University of Delaware
    Associate Professor of Sociology and Criminal Justice
    Mary Pattillo
    Northwestern University
    Professor and Chair of Sociology and African-American Studies
    Susan Pearce, PhD
    West Virginia University
    Visiting Assistant Professor, Division of Sociology and Anthropology
    David N. Pellow
    University of California, San Diego
    Professor of Ethnic Studies
    Michael P. Predmore
    Stanford University
    Professor of Spanish
    Robert D. Putnam
    Harvard University
    Malkin Professor of Public Policy, Kennedy School of Government
    Mary Romero
    Arizona State University
    Professor of Sociology, Justice & Social Inquiry
    Lory D. Rosenberg
    Author, Immigration Law and Crimes
    Former Appellate Immigration Judge, U.S. Board of Immigration Appeals; and Adjunct Professor, Washington College of Law
    Rubén G. Rumbaut
    University of California, Irvine
    Professor of Sociology
    Robert J. Sampson
    Harvard University
    Henry Ford II Professor and Chair of Sociology
    Mariano Sana
    Louisiana State University
    Assistant Professor of Sociology
    Alex M. Saragoza
    University of California, Berkeley
    Professor of Ethnic Studies
    Leslie Salzinger
    Boston College
    Associate Professor of Sociology
    Joachim J. Savelsberg
    University of Minnesota
    Professor of Sociology
    Armin Schwegler
    University of California, Irvine
    Professor of Spanish Linguistics & Director of Global Cultures
    Denise Segura
    University of California, Santa Barbara
    Professor of Sociology
    Carroll Seron
    University of California, Irvine
    Professor of Criminology, Law & Society
    Andy Silverman
    University of Arizona, Rogers College of Law
    Joseph M. Livermore Professor of Law and Director of Clinical Programs
    David A. Smith
    University of California, Irvine
    Professor of Sociology and Co-Editor, Contemporary Sociology
    Robert Smith
    Baruch College and the Graduate Center, City University of New York
    Associate Professor of Sociology, Immigration Studies and Public Affairs
    Deborah Smith
    University of Montana School of Law
    Adjunct Professor
    Laurel Smith-Doerr
    Boston University
    Assistant Professor of Sociology
    Dan R. Smulian
    Brooklyn Law School
    Assistant Professor of Clinical Law
    Janet P. Stamatel
    The University at Albany, State University of New York
    Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice
    Norman H. Stamper, Ph.D.
    Chief of Police, Seattle (Ret.), and Chief of Police, San Diego (Ret.)
    Judith Stepan-Norris
    University of California, Irvine
    Professor of Sociology
    Carola Suárez-Orozco
    New York University
    Chair and Professor of Applied Psychology; Co-Director of Immigration Studies, Steinhardt School of Culture, Education & Human Development, NYU
    Terrance J. Taylor
    University of Missouri-St. Louis
    Associate Research Professor of Criminology and Criminal Justice
    Barrie Thorne
    University of California, Berkeley
    Professor of Sociology and Professor and Chair of Gender & Women’s Studies
    Marta Tienda
    Princeton University
    Professor of Sociology and Public Affairs, and Past President, Population Association of America
    Donald Tomaskovic-Devy
    University of Massachusetts
    Professor and Chair of Sociology
    Enid Trucios-Haynes
    University of Louisville, Brandeis School of Law
    Professor of Law
    Ruth N. López Turley
    University of Wisconsin, Madison
    Assistant Professor of Sociology
    Jeffery T. Ulmer
    The Pennsylvania State University
    Associate Professor of Sociology and Crime, Law, and Justice
    Abel Valenzuela Jr.
    University of California, Los Angeles
    Associate Professor of Urban Planning
    Edward Vargas
    Indiana University-Bloomington
    Associate Instructor of Public and Environmental Affairs
    Alexander T. Vazsonyi
    Auburn University
    Professor of Human Development and Family Studies
    Geoff Ward
    Northeastern University
    Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice
    R. Stephen Warner
    University of Illinois at Chicago
    Professor of Sociology
    Mary C. Waters
    Harvard University
    M.E. Zukerman Professor of Sociology
    Deborah M. Weissman
    University of North Carolina School of Law
    Professor of Law and Director of Clinical Programs
    Bruce Western
    Princeton University
    Professor of Sociology
    Judith Wittner
    Loyola University, Chicago
    Professor of Sociology
    Norman R. Yetman
    The University of Kansas
    Emeritus Professor of American Studies & Sociology
    Min Zhou
    University of California, Los Angeles
    Professor of Sociology & Asian American Studies
    Aristide R. Zolberg
    New School for Social Research
    Walter Eberstadt Professor of Political Science
    Frank M. Afflitto, Ph.D.
    Kentucky Wesleyan College
    Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice
    Alan Aja
    Brooklyn College (CUNY)
    Professor of Puerto Rican & Latino Studies
    A. Aneesh
    University of Wisconsin
    Assistant Professor of Sociology and Global Studies
    Judith Blau
    University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
    Professor
    María Estela Brisk
    Boston College
    Professor, Lynch School of Education
    Natasha Cabrera
    University of Maryland
    Professor
    Charissa S. L. Cheah, Ph.D.
    University of Maryland, Baltimore County
    Assistant Professor of Psychology
    José A. Cobas, Ph.D.
    Arizona State University
    Professor of Sociology, School of Social and Family Dynamics
    Julie A. Dowling, Ph.D.
    University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
    Assistant Professor of Latina/Latino Studies Program
    Westy A. Egmont, PhD
    Founder, Association of New Americans
    Dina Francesca Haynes
    New England School of Law
    Professor
    Matthew I. Hirsch
    Widener University School of Law
    Adjunct Professor of Immigration Law
    Carol S. Huntsinger, Ph.D.
    College of Lake County
    Professor of Psychology and Education
    Nikki Jones
    University of California
    Assistant Professor of Sociology
    Christy Woodward Kaupert
    San Antonio College
    Assistant Professor of Political Science
    Maria Kefalas
    Saint Joseph’s University, Associate Professor
    Director, Institute for Violence Research and Prevention
    Gabriel Kuperminc, Ph.D.
    Georgia State University
    Associate Professor of Psychology
    Thao Le, Ph.D., MPH
    Colorado State University
    Assistant Professor of Human Development and Family Studies
    Peggy Levitt
    Wellesley College
    Chair and Associate Professor of Sociology
    Ana S.Q. Liberato, Ph.D.
    University of Florida
    Visiting Assistant Professor, Center for Women’s Studies and Gender Research
    Dr Patrick McGovern
    Princeton University
    Visiting Fellow, Department of Sociology
    Janet S. Oh, Ph.D.
    California State University Northridge
    Assistant Professor of Psychology
    Irma M. Olmedo
    University of Illinois Chicago
    Associate Professor
    R.S. Oropesa
    Department of Sociology
    Professor of Sociology & Demography
    Julia L. Perilla, Ph.D.
    Georgia State University
    Associate Professor of Psychology
    Lesley Williams Reid
    Georgia State University
    Associate Professor of Sociology
    Stephen T. Russell
    University of Arizona
    Professor of Family Studies & Human Development
    Norton School of Family & Consumer Sciences
    Traci Schlesinger, PhD
    DePaul University
    Assistant Professor
    Lisa Patel Stevens, Ph.D.
    Boston College
    Assistant Professor

  • Avatar
    Frank
    November 19, 2007 at 7:38 am

    laura, first of all this isn’t about “immigrants” it is about illegal aliens. In Los Angeles alone the most outstanding warrants for arrest for heinous crimes is for illegal aliens.
    There are many reasons to be opposed to illegal immigration and increased crime is only a part of it. My main objection is that it is against the law. Crime, uncontrolled population growth, competition for jobs. border security, overcrowded schools, jails and hospitals, unassimilation into our society, depletion of our natural resources, tax evasion, stolen I.D.’s and SS numbers are just the by products of illegal immigration.

  • Avatar
    Horace
    November 20, 2007 at 6:29 pm

    “My friends, why not stick to the facts ? The facts are that immigrants commit less violent crimes than native-born citizens.”
    The fact is Laura, all of your studies include the illegal alien subset in their set of immigrants. Legal immigrants, those who vastly outnumber the subset of illegal immigrants are vetted by the use of background checks, while illegal immigrants are not. It is logical to expect that legal immigrants are less likely to commit crimes, as we prohibit the immigration of the criminal element. It is impossible to make any concrete statements about illegal immigrants, as no one can do a separate study on them because they remain unknown, even in number. If one cannot determine the number who are illegal, then one cannot do the ratios to establish a rate. Laura, you are doing what every illegal alien advocate does, and that’s obfuscating the truth by citing erroneous information.

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