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Latina Lista: News from the Latinx perspective > Columns & Features > Global Views > Large number of Mexico’s fathers are between the ages of 15-24

Large number of Mexico’s fathers are between the ages of 15-24

LatinaLista — On this Father’s Day, as we honor Dad for all that he does, it’s interesting to note that across the border in Mexico, today is also Father’s Day.

The country’s National Population Council or Conapo released some interesting facts about their country’s fathers which was reported in the Mexico City daily El Universal.

The most striking element is that there are 1.3 million Mexican fathers who are between the ages of 15 and 24. They are part of the larger number of 20.8 million who live with their children. Of the 18.9 million who work, 656,000 don’t receive a salary, 10.8 million work two jobs earning minimum wage, 5.3 million work more than 2 up to 5 jobs and 2.1 million work more than 5 jobs.

Which all goes to show, for the 1.3 million who are young and have family responsibilities and there is the prospect of working only one or two jobs and earning decent money to support their families, wall or no wall, immigration enforcement or not, it’s no wonder that the risks of crossing the border illegally doesn’t weigh as much on their minds as the idea of not being able to feed their families.

Wouldn’t it be better for Mexico and the US to create a program where they can come, work and earn money legally without having to sacrifice going months and years without seeing their families?

When that day arrives, it will truly be a happy Father’s Day for all fathers.

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Comment(76)

  • Avatar
    Frank
    June 15, 2008 at 12:44 pm

    15 years old, with little education, no job and producing children they can’t feed unless they violate another country’s immigration laws? Pathetic!

  • Avatar
    Thomas
    June 15, 2008 at 3:06 pm

    Typical. The Invader leeches of the American taxpayer and lives on welfare thanks to their anchor child. No wonder California is going down the drain.

  • Avatar
    Evelyn
    June 15, 2008 at 5:57 pm

    Typical. The Invader leeches of the American taxpayer and lives on welfare thanks to their anchor child. No wonder California is going down the drain.
    Another racist rant from another KKKer. Yawn.
    The invader leeches were your ancestors Thomas, and you are the anchor baby!

  • Avatar
    Horace
    June 15, 2008 at 6:51 pm

    This cultural flaw is one of the reasons we don’t need Mexican illegal aliens in this country. Who would really believe such people wouldn’t turn to our public welfare system after reaching the end of their “path to citizenship”. Don’t forget this all you intellectual Hispanics who can’t wait for amnesty, you’ll be paying your share of the taxes to support these irresponsible people. Actually it will occur sooner, as they’ll be claiming welfare on behalf of their already citizen children. I can’t wait to hear you wail when this happens. You’ll probably also wonder why these parents can’t send their kids to college and become the leaders of tomorrow. Such actions on your part will assure that Latino children who have children will remain the servant class for decades to come.

  • Avatar
    Grandma
    June 15, 2008 at 11:25 pm

    Just this week in a small community south of my city, a 15 year old illegal gang banger, whose 15 year old girlfriend had just been released from the hospital with their new baby, was proudly showing his friends his gun when he accidently shot himself in the head and died. What a role model for children.

  • Avatar
    anonymous
    June 16, 2008 at 9:38 am

    45 year olds, with little education, no job and blaming society and every non-white in the USA for their own problems and refuse to get off their butt to work and thinks everything should be handed to them? Pathetic!

  • Avatar
    anonymous
    June 16, 2008 at 9:44 am

    Typical. The Racist bloodsuckers of the American dream who dreams of living in a all-white world with the non-white living at their feet. No wonder nobody wants to visit the South

  • Avatar
    Thomas
    June 16, 2008 at 12:04 pm

    Wow now I see everything. I post a comment and they assume I’m white. Whose the real racist? You got a thing against white people thats your deal but I’m a half breed, Half white and half latino. We didn’t sneak across the border like common criminals. What gets me we have our people to take care of and corrupt countries around the world are dumping their unwanteds on this country. Doesn’t it upset you that mexico or whatever doesn’t wan’t you back. Doesn’t that make you feel like dirt. Like a plague. Send you off to the desert. If you die great if you make make sure you dend the dollars home as your loyalty is to the old country. Your no American your a taker. We don’t need takers. We have enough of them in Washington.

  • Avatar
    Frank
    June 16, 2008 at 12:14 pm

    I don’t know of many 45 year old citizens that fit your scenario, anonymous. You are grasping at straws here. But for those that do, they are also pathetic.
    I don’t know of many Americans who dream of living in an all white world either. Only the KKK types. The majority of whites and other citizens who oppose illegal immigration are not KKKers contrary to the lies spread in here.

  • Avatar
    Evelyn
    June 16, 2008 at 12:29 pm

    Grandma I see your point here is another one
    Cops Witness Beating of an Elderly Homeless Man
    May 18: Several police officers dressed in plainclothes were patrolling Memorial Boulevard when they witnessed four teenage boys with shaved heads attack a black man, Cutis Johnson, 63. It was 12:30 am when the boys approached Johnson, who was sleeping behind a Rent-A-Wheel auto shop. They started punching, shouting racial slurs and cursing at him to get up. Johnson rose to his feet and ran from the teens. The boys chased after him throwing rocks and beer bottles. One bottle hit Johnson in the right elbow resulting in dislocation and a deep gash. While three boys harassed Johnson, one boy searched through Johnson’s possessions. The police halted the attack and arrested the young teens, Dexter Davis, 15, David Truedell, 13, Etoy Love, 14, and Wesley Delancy, 15. They are charged with strong-arm robbery and aggravated battery. Truedell faces additional charges for resisting arrest. Johnson was taken to Lakeland Regional Medical Center for care. Local police, advocates, and homeless people in the area agree that attacks on the homeless, especially by groups of teens, are far too common.
    Tampa, Florida
    This was a hate crime. Are the parents of these boys teaching them to hate other people because of the color of their skin?

  • Avatar
    Evelyn
    June 16, 2008 at 12:36 pm

    The work ethic of these Young Fathers is enviable.
    Of the 18.9 million who work, 656,000 don’t receive a salary, 10.8 million work two jobs earning minimum wage, 5.3 million work more than 2 up to 5 jobs and 2.1 million work more than 5 jobs.
    They could show a thing or two to all the men who spend the entire day and night in these forums.

  • Avatar
    Evelyn
    June 16, 2008 at 12:43 pm

    15 years old, with little education, no job and producing children they can’t feed unless they violate another country’s immigration laws? Pathetic!
    These fathers are from Mexico. What immigration laws are they violating.
    In fact maybe we should invite them here and throw out some of the dead beat dads that dont want to support their children! At least these fathers do support their children.

  • Avatar
    Frank
    June 16, 2008 at 4:16 pm

    Wow, what an assumption! For one thing I don’t spend ALL day in here. For another I am retired. Any more questions?
    Someone needs to re-read the article. It was stated that many of these Mexican father’s do cross our borders illegally to feed these kids that they fathered at 15 years old. Why have kids at 15 or any other age that you can’t feed unless you violate U.S. immigration law?

  • Avatar
    arturo fernandez
    June 16, 2008 at 6:47 pm

    Why is it so alarming that 5% of Mexican fathers are under 24. 95% are over 24.

  • Avatar
    arturo fernandez
    June 16, 2008 at 6:51 pm

    Here is good news coming out of Mexico.
    http://www.latimes.com/business/la-fi-mexgdp23-2008may23,0,6944412.story

  • Avatar
    adriana
    June 16, 2008 at 8:13 pm

    I’m kind of saddened that so many Mexican men enter fatherhood so quickly. It kind of points to the priorities in the culture. Mexico has so many natural resources that it could improve its educational system dramatically if it could sell the resources successfully. If only more of these men had access to education and were raised to think and dream beyond having to cross the border to make a living…

  • Avatar
    Evelyn
    June 16, 2008 at 9:04 pm

    “Wow now I see everything. I post a comment and they assume I’m white. Whose the real racist?”
    ~~~
    You are the racist, as your comment was a racist comment using the pejorative ‘anchor baby’, and ‘leeches’ in reference to hispanics. I didnt assume anything. I merely turned your racist comment to refer to you. Racists come in all colors. It is their speech that gives them away.
    ~~~
    “You got a thing against white people thats your deal but I’m a half breed, Half white and half latino. We didn’t sneak across the border like common criminals.”
    Migrating is not a crime in America it is an Administrative Issue. Therefore Immigrants are not criminals.
    ~~~
    “What gets me we have our people to take care of and corrupt countries around the world are dumping their unwanteds on this country.”
    Every time you buy products or use services provided by unauthorized immigrants you are recruiting them just like the lady in the article below. Just a few years ago these websites were readily recruiting immigrants from Mexico.
    When she could not find enough workers for the construction firm owned by her son Thomas, Ann Carroll decided to go online. After typing in such search terms as “construction laborer” and “Mexican workers,” she landed on the Web site for Foreign Labor Solutions. Within days she had a quote: $100 each for 11 Mexican workers.” In October, Carrol’s
    Construction Co. recruits began laying sewer pipes in Ocean Springs, where the company is located. “I don’t know what we would’ve done if we didn’t go this route,” says Carroll. “We’re very happy with the workers.”
    With no visas available, labor shortages, and on the verge of loosing their business Carroll feels she did the right thing.
    But as Carroll’s experience shows, using an online middleman can be efficient and cost-effective. The recruitment company was founded in 2002 by Taylor, an entrepreneur descended from a family of American settlers in Mexico. Business took off when he set up a Web site about a year ago and began advertising on Yahoo (YHOO ) and Google (GOOG ). The site boasts of “hardworking people acclimated to tough physical labor and who have worked under severe warm-weather conditions”–guys like Andreas Alcala Martinez, 29, who works for Carroll Construction. “Little money, but not hard work,” says Martinez. He makes $12 an hour and he has worked for Carroll for 10 months.
    ~~~
    Doesn’t it upset you that mexico or whatever doesn’t wan’t you back. Doesn’t that make you feel like dirt. Like a plague. Send you off to the desert. If you die great if you make make sure you dend the dollars home as your loyalty is to the old country.”
    ~~~
    I am well liked in Mexico. In fact I have a wonderful summer home in Mexico where I go to be pampered, even though I am not Mexican.
    ~~~
    Your no American your a taker. We don’t need takers. We have enough of them in Washington
    I am not only a true Indigenous American and Irish American I am an American who is proud of my country and will uphold the constution even if it means giving my life.
    I am however very embarrised by all the racism against people of color. I do not like racism and I pity racists. I will also do everything in my power to fight against it as our constution calls.

  • Avatar
    Evelyn
    June 16, 2008 at 10:47 pm

    OK lets read it!
    The country’s National Population Council or Conapo “IS A MEXICAN GOV AGENCY” released some interesting facts ABOUT THEIR COUNTRY’S FATHERS which was reported in the Mexico City daily El Universal IS A MEXICAN NEWSPAPER
    The most striking element is that there are 1.3 million Mexican fathers who are between the ages of 15 and 24. They are part of the larger number of 20.8 million who live with their children.
    Of the 18.9 million who work, 656,000 don’t receive a salary, 10.8 million work two jobs earning minimum wage, 5.3 million work more than 2 up to 5 jobs and 2.1 million work more than
    This article shows I am basing the fact that the Fathers are living in Mexico because that is what the article states.
    The statics are from a Mexican Gov Agency and published by a well known Mexican Newspaper.

  • Avatar
    Liquidmicro
    June 16, 2008 at 10:53 pm

    “Every time you buy products or use services provided by unauthorized immigrants you are recruiting them just like the lady in the article below. Just a few years ago these websites were readily recruiting immigrants from Mexico.”
    You are under the impression that Ann Carrol hired “Illegal Immigrants”.
    Do your research on the “recruiters”, as the people they promise to send are, according to their own web sites, visa holders.
    The USA based client requests Latinworkers.com locates, interviews, vets and approves a worker(s) from within our geographic area. Latinworkers.com will be responsible for the solicitation and emission of a work visa. Latinworkers.com guarantees that an applicant will be successful procuring a work visa.
    http://latinworkers.com/service2.html
    From Labormex, which Mrs. Carrol used.
    http://hospitality.labormex.com/hospitalityFLS.htm
    Foreign Labor Solutions
    The H2 nonimmigrant program permits employers to hire foreign workers to come to the U.S. and perform temporary work.
    1. The job must be one time, seasonal, peak load or intermittent.
    2. The job must be for lees than one year, but can be recurrent annually.
    3. There must be no Americans willing or able to work for you.
    There is a 66,000 per year limit on the number of foreign workers who may receive H-2B (non-agriculture) status during each USCIS fiscal year (October through September).
    We make this tedious process simple by dealing directly with government agencies to ensure that you get certified to hire H2 workers.
    1. Your application is sent to your local Department of Labor along with proof of temporary need.
    2. We run an ad in a local paper to make sure that no Americans in your area are able or willing to work for you. – 30 days to complete this process
    3. All documents are forwarded to the DOL Regional offices for certification.
    4. After we receive the original Certificate, we forward it along with other applications to Immigration
    5. Homeland Security or USCIS approves case.
    Transportation: We will make sure that the workers arrive at your doorstep. Transportation to and from work must not be paid by the company, but must be made available.
    Housing: Housing does not have to be paid by the employer, but it must be made available as well, meaning that a reasonable rent or fee can be charged.
    http://www.businessweek.com/magazine/content/07_03/b4017085.htm
    Your business week article doesn’t mention this line that you have inserted:
    “With no visas available, labor shortages, and on the verge of loosing their business Carroll feels she did the right thing.”
    So why the lying on your part. Did you not comprehend the article or is this some more of your opinionated facts?

  • Avatar
    arturo fernandez
    June 16, 2008 at 10:55 pm

    Frank, Thomas, Horace, Grandma,
    Why are you so quick with negativity over such a small percentage of Mexican fathers being 24 and under? That’s only 5%, in a 10 year range, 15-24. Probably most of those are closer to 24, with very few being just 15. Yet, you grab on to the number 15 to prove cultural deficiencies on a whole population. What’s going on in your heads?

  • Avatar
    Grandma
    June 16, 2008 at 10:58 pm

    Evelyn :
    “Migrating is not a crime in America it is an Administrative Issue. Therefore Immigrants are not criminals.”
    Really? Tell that to my office. We prosecute illegals all day long and alot of them are arrested for EWIs (entry without inspection). They’re arrested, finger printed, booked, put in jail and get their day in court with an interpreter (all at the expense of the American taxpayer). And guess what, they get convicted of a CRIME. So when they come back like they all do, they then get charged with a felony.

  • Avatar
    Evelyn
    June 17, 2008 at 3:05 pm

    Grandma
    I will leave it up to you to correctly inform your office. This is something that many Americans are not aware of, but it is fact.
    November 30, 2007
    Illegal Immigration is Not a Criminal Offense
    Posted by KUT under Civil Liberties, Civil Rights, Election 08, immigration
    At the Republican Presidential CNN/YouTube debate on Wednesday night, Mike Huckabee tried to explain a plan he introduced as governor of Arkansas to provide the children of undocumented immigrants a college education. He said:
    Huckabee: I supported the bill that would’ve allowed those children who had been in our schools their entire school life the opportunity to have the same scholarship that their peers had, who had also gone to high school with them and sat in the same classrooms.
    They couldn’t just move in in their senior year and go to college. It wasn’t about out of state tuition. It was an academic, meritorious scholarship called the Academic Challenge Scholarship.
    Now, let me tell you a couple of provisions of it. And, by the way, it didn’t pass. It passed the House but got in the Senate and got caught up in the same kind of controversy that this country is caught up in.
    And here’s what happened. This bill would’ve said that if you came here, not because you made the choice but because your parents did, that we’re not going to punish a child because the parent committed a crime.
    That’s not what we typically do in this country.
    I thought this was an interesting response because while Huckabee is trying to appeal to the better angels of our nature here, he is still getting some wrong. And probably deliberately, which is undocumented immigration is not a crime, its a civil violation. That is to say, unauthorized immigration to the United States, is not punishable through the U.S. criminal code.
    In fact, deportation or removal proceedings are actually conducted in civil court, not criminal court.
    But so many of us have had it beat into our heads that undocumented immigrants carry this aura of inherent criminality around them because all we here is illegal immigration, illegal immigration, illegal immigration, illegal immigration.
    Even Republican front runner Rudy Guiliani got slaughtered by his base when he tried to inform people about this distinction.
    And assuming that we could charged all immigrants without papers or who are unauthorized with criminal charges, that would lead to a administrative nightmare that would do more harm than good. Our courts could not handle those cases and there is no where near the manpower to conduct mass deportation. Not to mention families would be broken apart and many of those charged would be detained almost indefinitely while the government figures out what to do with them.
    Some of this is obviously already happening.
    Of course, some people may think this is a mere semantic distinction, but its not. Its about trying to think straight about a problem before it gets worse

  • Avatar
    Frank
    June 17, 2008 at 4:09 pm

    Let’s face it arturo, both Latino men and women start producing children at a very young age instead of continuing their educations and putting it off until they can afford to feed a family. It is just a fact!

  • Avatar
    arturo fernandez
    June 17, 2008 at 7:50 pm

    It is not a fact. It’s the past, like the US had that in its past. You face it: your opinions aren’t based on fact.

  • Avatar
    arturo fernandez
    June 17, 2008 at 8:11 pm

    In the 1970s, the average woman in Mexico had six children. Today, it’s two.

  • Avatar
    Horace
    June 17, 2008 at 8:49 pm

    “Grandma
    I will leave it up to you to correctly inform your office. This is something that many Americans are not aware of, but it is fact.”
    You’re an ass, Evelyn. Illegal immigration is punishable as a crime, especially when it is a repeat office, which may be what Grandma is referring to. Even one time illegal entries are punishable by jail time.
    This is an extract form the Code of Federal Regulations. I’ve given you more than you need to judge for yourself. You should familiarize yourself with these laws, as you may need to defend your friends facing deportation:
    United States Code
    TITLE 8 – ALIENS AND NATIONALITY
    CHAPTER 12 – IMMIGRATION AND NATIONALITY
    SUBCHAPTER II – IMMIGRATION
    PART VIII – GENERAL PENALTY PROVISIONS
    U.S. Code as of: 01/03/05
    Section 1325. Improper entry by alien
    (a) Improper time or place; avoidance of examination or inspection;
    misrepresentation and concealment of facts
    Any alien who (1) enters or attempts to enter the United States
    at any time or place other than as designated by immigration
    officers, or (2) eludes examination or inspection by immigration
    officers, or (3) attempts to enter or obtains entry to the United
    States by a willfully false or misleading representation or the
    willful concealment of a material fact, shall, for the first
    commission of any such offense, be fined under title 18 or
    imprisoned not more than 6 months, or both, and, for a subsequent
    commission of any such offense, be fined under title 18, or
    imprisoned not more than 2 years, or both.
    (b) Improper time or place; civil penalties
    Any alien who is apprehended while entering (or attempting to
    enter) the United States at a time or place other than as
    designated by immigration officers shall be subject to a civil
    penalty of –
    (1) at least $50 and not more than $250 for each such entry (or
    attempted entry); or
    (2) twice the amount specified in paragraph (1) in the case of
    an alien who has been previously subject to a civil penalty under
    this subsection.
    Civil penalties under this subsection are in addition to, and not
    in lieu of, any criminal or other civil penalties that may be
    imposed.
    (c) Marriage fraud
    Any individual who knowingly enters into a marriage for the
    purpose of evading any provision of the immigration laws shall be
    imprisoned for not more than 5 years, or fined not more than
    $250,000, or both.
    (d) Immigration-related entrepreneurship fraud
    Any individual who knowingly establishes a commercial enterprise
    for the purpose of evading any provision of the immigration laws
    shall be imprisoned for not more than 5 years, fined in accordance
    with title 18, or both.
    Section 1326. Reentry of removed aliens
    (a) In general
    Subject to subsection (b) of this section, any alien who –
    (1) has been denied admission, excluded, deported, or removed
    or has departed the United States while an order of exclusion,
    deportation, or removal is outstanding, and thereafter
    (2) enters, attempts to enter, or is at any time found in, the
    United States, unless (A) prior to his reembarkation at a place
    outside the United States or his application for admission from
    foreign contiguous territory, the Attorney General has expressly
    consented to such alien’s reapplying for admission; or (B) with
    respect to an alien previously denied admission and removed,
    unless such alien shall establish that he was not required to
    obtain such advance consent under this chapter or any prior Act,
    shall be fined under title 18, or imprisoned not more than 2 years,
    or both.
    (b) Criminal penalties for reentry of certain removed aliens
    Notwithstanding subsection (a) of this section, in the case of
    any alien described in such subsection –
    (1) whose removal was subsequent to a conviction for commission
    of three or more misdemeanors involving drugs, crimes against the
    person, or both, or a felony (other than an aggravated felony),
    such alien shall be fined under title 18, imprisoned not more
    than 10 years, or both;
    (2) whose removal was subsequent to a conviction for commission
    of an aggravated felony, such alien shall be fined under such
    title, imprisoned not more than 20 years, or both;
    (3) who has been excluded from the United States pursuant to
    section 1225(c) of this title because the alien was excludable
    under section 1182(a)(3)(B) of this title or who has been removed
    from the United States pursuant to the provisions of subchapter V
    of this chapter, and who thereafter, without the permission of
    the Attorney General, enters the United States, or attempts to do
    so, shall be fined under title 18 and imprisoned for a period of
    10 years, which sentence shall not run concurrently with any
    other sentence.(!1) or
    (4) who was removed from the United States pursuant to section
    1231(a)(4)(B) of this title who thereafter, without the
    permission of the Attorney General, enters, attempts to enter, or
    is at any time found in, the United States (unless the Attorney
    General has expressly consented to such alien’s reentry) shall be
    fined under title 18, imprisoned for not more than 10 years, or
    both.
    For the purposes of this subsection, the term “removal” includes
    any agreement in which an alien stipulates to removal during (or
    not during) a criminal trial under either Federal or State law.
    (c) Reentry of alien deported prior to completion of term of
    imprisonment
    Any alien deported pursuant to section 1252(h)(2) (!2) of this
    title who enters, attempts to enter, or is at any time found in,
    the United States (unless the Attorney General has expressly
    consented to such alien’s reentry) shall be incarcerated for the
    remainder of the sentence of imprisonment which was pending at the
    time of deportation without any reduction for parole or supervised
    release. Such alien shall be subject to such other penalties
    relating to the reentry of deported aliens as may be available
    under this section or any other provision of law.
    (d) Limitation on collateral attack on underlying deportation order
    In a criminal proceeding under this section, an alien may not
    challenge the validity of the deportation order described in
    subsection (a)(1) of this section or subsection (b) of this section
    unless the alien demonstrates that –
    (1) the alien exhausted any administrative remedies that may
    have been available to seek relief against the order;
    (2) the deportation proceedings at which the order was issued
    improperly deprived the alien of the opportunity for judicial
    review; and
    (3) the entry of the order was fundamentally unfair.
    —————————-
    Misdemeanor defined
    MISDEMEANOR – A minor crime (as opposed to a felony). A crime – less serious than a felony – which is punishable by fine or imprisonment in a city or county jail rather than in a penitentiary.
    This term is used to express every offence inferior to felony, punishable by indictment, or by particular prescribed proceedings; in its usual acceptation, it is applied to all those crimes and offences for which the law has not provided a particular name; this word is generally used in contradistinction to felony; misdemeanors comprehending all indictable offences, which do not amount to felony, as perjury, battery, libels, conspiracies and public nuisances

  • Avatar
    Horace
    June 17, 2008 at 9:05 pm

    Well Evelyn, every person, be he citizen or illegl alien who obtains work has to fill out an Form I-9, Employment Eligibility Verification form swearing that he is eligible to work, and has to present a Social Security card. See http://www.uscis.gov/files/form/I-9.pdf Illegal aliens are committing fraud punishable by fines and/or imprisonment if they sign such a form. Millions of illegal aliens have done so, and subject to arrest. Millions of illegal aliens have knowingly submitted forged Social Security cards to their employers and are thus guilty of fraud. If the government chose to do so, every illegal alien who signs an I-9 could wind up in a federal prison for several years. If the laws were enforced, the federal prisons would be filled with your friends.

  • Avatar
    Alessandra
    June 17, 2008 at 10:11 pm

    From everything I have read, this might have more to do with educational and income level than Mexican culture.
    Middle and upper income Mexicans do not have more children than the average middle and upper income Americans. However, the lower educated and more rural people tend to have larger families. It is mostly the lower educated and lower income Latinos who are migrating into the U.S.
    One must look at the society as a whole and not just one segment of it.
    Would be like looking at white, uneducated trailer park dwellers and saying that is representative of white Americans. (not trying to offend any white trailer park residents as there are many good, decent, and hardworking people who live in trailers; just trying to make a point).
    In school we were educated that putting off childbearing until we completed our educations and got married was optimal. We were taught it was the best way to insure a prosperous future and that having children too early could often lead to a cycle of poverty. Maybe Mexico needs this type of education in their schools? Of course, it doesn’t always work, but it doesn’t hurt either.

  • Avatar
    Irma
    June 17, 2008 at 10:17 pm

    Sad ,but true. Their machismo
    prevents them from using contraception. No wonder,
    so few of us struggle all our lives
    just to keep a roof over us.
    Who can be a doctor, lawyer or president of the United States when you have a baby to raise and you
    are a 15 year old parent?
    Somebody needs to wake up.

  • Avatar
    Grandma
    June 17, 2008 at 11:09 pm

    “Evelyn: I will leave it up to you to correctly inform your office. This is something that many Americans are not aware of, but it is fact.”
    I’m sure my office would balk at your post since we take our orders from DC, not you. Maybe you should pose that question to the AG of the US. I’m sure he would disagree with you since my office follows immigration law. Not the ACLU.

  • Avatar
    Grandma
    June 17, 2008 at 11:16 pm

    Are these the wonderful fathers you speak of?
    Mexican Invaders Have Declared Open-Season On American Children
    By Dave Gibson (06/17/08)
    Contrary to what President Bush claims, family values do stop at the Rio Grande for many illegal aliens. In addition to suppressing wages, driving drunk, bankrupting our hospitals, and over-crowding our jails and public schools, illegal aliens are preying upon our children.
    In Operation Predator sweeps across the country conducted between 2003-2007, Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents nabbed over 10,700 foreign national child molesters. Many of these predators had been previously convicted of other crimes, and many had already been deported once. The number predators apprehended in the sweeps actually only represent the tip of the iceberg.
    In fact, a study conducted by the Violent Crimes Institute reports that between 1999 and 2006, there were nearly 1,000,000 sex crimes committed in the United States by illegal aliens.
    Using U.S. Department of Justice, Immigration, as well as state and local law enforcement data, Deborah Schurman-Kauflin of the Violent Crimes Institute determined that there are no less than 240,000 illegal alien sex offenders currently inside the U.S.
    A very cursory search on the subject of illegal aliens committing acts of child molestation turned up countless examples of the growing problem. The following are two recent ones:
    -The suspect in the recent rape of a 13 year old Alabama girl is believed to be an illegal alien. Mobile County Sheriff’s detectives are looking for a man named Domingo Lorenzo for the rape which was reported on June 4.
    Sheriff’s department spokesman Sgt. Jerry Taylor said: “The first thing they’re trying to do is verify his true identity. Once that’s done they’ll be able to check with immigration officials to see if he did have the proper credentials to enter the country.”
    Lorenzo is known to neighbors of a West Mobile trailer park, though the owner of Ridgewood Acres claims that he has no record of Lorenzo paying rent. Many residents told reporters he is frequently on the premises.
    Warren McLamore, the victim‘s father told a WKRG reporter: “My daughter doesn’t even go outside now. If she does, I just put her in the car, lock the doors, get in and get out of here.”
    -On May 28, a 25 year old Mexican national named Israel Lugo Rios was arrested and charged with molesting a 3 year old Bradenton, FL girl. The little girls was taken to Manatee Memorial Hospital after complaining of pain. Upon medical examination, it was discovered that the girl had been sexually violated.
    The sheriff’s department has determined that Rios is in the country illegally.
    In 2007, Americans For Legal Immigration Political Action Committee (ALIPAC) tracked child sexual assaults committed by illegal aliens. In a 30 day period, they recorded 27 assaults by foreign nationals illegally inside the United States. The results are as follows:
    July 28, 2007
    Milwaukee, Oregon
    Charged: Alejandro Emetrio “Alex” Rivera Gamboa, 24, and Gilberto Javier Arellano-Gamboa, 23
    Charges: rape and murder
    Victim: Dani Countryman of Texas (15 years old)
    August 6, 2007
    Trenton, N.J.
    Charged: Jose Carranza, 28
    Charges: child rape (later charged with murder of Newark teenagers as well)
    Victim: child’s name withheld
    August 16, 2007
    Huron, Ohio
    Charged: Lucio Sanchez-Martinez
    Charge: gross sexual imposition of a minor
    Victim: 8 year old girl
    August 20, 2007
    Oregon City, Oregon
    Charged: Alejandro Hernandez-Flores, 19 and Mario Alberto Flores-Estrada, 20
    Charges: rape, sodomy, and sexual abuse
    Victims: two girls ages 14 and 15
    August 21, 2007
    Franklin County, Alabama
    Charged: Alvaro Vargas, 38
    Charge: rape, sexual abuse
    Victim: 11 year old girl
    August 23, 2007
    Bryan County, Oklahoma
    Sought/Charged: Jose Retana
    Charge: rape by instrumentation
    Victim: 4 year old girl
    August 24, 2007
    Indianapolis, Indiana
    Charged: Jesus Valenzuela, 19
    Charges: child molestation and burglary
    Victim: 5 year old girl
    August 27, 2007
    McAllen, Texas
    Charged: Jorge Alberto Escobar
    Charge: aggravated kidnapping
    Victim: 5 year old girl
    August 27, 2007
    Rockville, Maryland
    Sought/Charged: Mahumbo Kanneh, 23
    Charges: rape, sexual assault, and molestation (Dismissed due to lack of interpreter!)
    Victims: 18 month and 7 year old girls
    August 15, 2007
    Indiantown, Florida
    Charged: Ruben Hernandez-Juarez, 52
    Charge: battery on a child for molesting
    Victim: 6 year old boy
    August 8, 2007
    North Hollywood, California
    Charged: Chalearmchai Nopthaisong, 41
    Charges: kidnapping and lewd acts on a child
    Victims: seven children (Police have since discovered six more victims ranging from age 4 to 8 years old.)
    July 20, 2007
    Tulsa, Oklahoma
    Charged: Daniel P. Ramirez, 39
    Charges: sexual battery
    Victim: 16 year old boy
    August 14, 2007
    Portsmouth, Massachusetts
    Charged: Marvin Hernandez, 27
    Charges: sexual assault
    Victim: 14 year old girl
    August 20, 2007
    Gaston County, North Carolina
    Charged: Ramon Zamora-Solano, 41
    Charges: kidnapping and sexual assault
    Victims: 5 and 6 year old girls
    August 9, 2007
    Poway, California
    Charged: Jesus Mora Nava, 30
    Charges: sexual assault
    Victim: 13 year old boy
    August 22, 2007
    Palm Bay, Florida
    Charged: Dwayne Modeste, 19
    Charges: rape (armed with a machete)
    Victims: 13 year old girl and 20 year old woman
    August 20, 2007
    Manchester, New Hampshire
    Charged: Alan Hernandez, 18
    Charges: sexual assault and criminal threatening
    Victim: 14 year old girl
    August 18, 2007
    Brewster, New York
    Charged: Sergio Antonio Martinez-Garza, 32
    Charges: two felony counts of sexual conduct against a child
    Victims: two girls ages 10 and 11
    August 18, 2007
    Brewster, New York
    Charged: Pedro Sagastume, 21
    Charges: rape
    Victim: 13 year old girl
    August 18, 2007
    Brewster, New York
    Charged: Jeremias Perez, 22
    Charges: rape
    Victim 15 year old girl
    July 28, 2007
    Tacoma, Washington
    Charged: Terapon Adhahn, 42
    Charges: rape, kidnapping, and murder
    Victim: Zina Linnik, 12
    July 30, 2007
    Murfreesboro, Tennessee
    Charged: Jesus G. “Egg” Garay-Barrientos, 18
    Charges: aggravated sexual battery and rape
    Victim: 6 year old girl
    July 27, 2007
    Alto, Texas
    Charged: Eleazar Posadas, 49
    Charges: indecent contact with a child
    Victim: 7 year old girl
    July 21, 2007
    Village of Monroe, New York
    Charged: Armando Sierra, 22
    Charges: statutory rape
    Victim: 14 year old girl
    August 16, 2007
    Bentonville, Arkansas
    Charged: Daniel Lopez Bibiano, 34
    Charges: attempted rape, sexual assault, and rape
    Victims: 5, 10, 12, 13, and 15 year old girls
    August 18, 2007
    Indianapolis, Indiana
    Charged: Israel Baez
    Charges: In custody on other charges. Approached a group of children and arrested with a ‘rape kit’ in his van.
    Witnesses: 5 children
    So why does the crime of child molestation seem to be so prevalent among illegal aliens from Mexico?…The answer may lie within the age-old Mexican culture of “machismo,” as well as within the actual laws of that country.
    The crime of rape or child molestation is incredibly under-reported in Mexico, because there is so much shame placed upon the victim as well as the difficulty in proving the case. A 2002 Pulitzer Prize winning Washington Post article, reporter Mary Jordan detailed the case of a 16 year old Mexican girl who had reported being raped by three policemen in 1997. When Yessica Yadira Diaz Cazares and her mother went to the police station to report the rape, she was laughed at by the officers and actually jailed overnight.
    Diaz was forced by police to undergo a medical exam as well as a total of eight blood tests. She was told that the blood tests would determine whether or not she had actually been raped. Prosecutors told the girl that she must physically put her hand on the men who raped her, courageously she proceeded even as the family received death threats.
    The accused officer laughed at her and verbally abused the girl as she identified him as an attacker. Eventually, Yessica realized that justice would never be served and simply gave up. Sadly, she not only gave up her search for justice but her life as well. Despondent, she committed suicide by taking an overdose of prescription pills.
    After Yessica’s death, the national human rights commission pursued the case, resulting in the conviction of two of the accused officers.
    The crime of kidnapping a woman for the purpose of rape and marriage against their will, or “rapto” as it is known in Mexico is actually a minor crime and rarely ever prosecuted. A Mexican legislator actually called the practice “romantic.” Of course, this crime if committed in the United States would elicit felony charges and a penalty of 20 years to life in prison.
    While rape is a serious crime in the United States, many Mexican nationals cannot understand why they are prosecuted on this side of the border. Often, a small payment of $10 to $20 to the victim’s family will settle the matter back in Mexico.
    The most troubling and telling reason behind the growing epidemic of child molestation at the hands of Mexican illegal aliens, is the fact the age of sexual consent throughout the majority of Mexico is 12 years of age!
    The only other nation in the world which boasts such a disregard for childhood innocence is Zimbabwe, where the age of consent is also 12.
    Article 177 of the Mexican Federal District Penal Code discusses “sexual abuse“ and punishment of other acts referred to as “unintentional” acts –“who without purpose of reaching copulation, performs a sexual act with a person under 12 or a person that has no capacity of understanding the meaning of the act or that for any reason cannot resist it, or that demands that such act is observed or performed, will be punished with 2 to 7 years in prison”.
    In addition to Mexico City, the age of consent is 12 years old in the following Mexican states:
    -Aquascalientes
    -Baja California Sur
    -Campeche
    -Coahuila
    -Guanajuato
    -Guerrero
    -Hidalgo
    -Jalisco
    -Michoacan
    -Morelos
    -Nayarit
    -Oaxaca
    -Puebla
    -San Louis Potosi
    -Sonora
    -Tabasco
    -Tamaulipas
    -Yucatan
    -Zacatecas
    The age of consent is 13 years old in Nuevo Leon and 14 years old in the seven remaining Mexican states.
    The attitude towards having sex with little girls is carried with many Mexican men as they cross into this country.
    An example of this attitude can be found in Mexican national Diego Lopez-Mendez, who pled guilty in 2006 to sexually assaulting a 10 year old West Virginia girl. Through an interpreter, he told the court: “In the pueblo where I grew up girls are usually married by 13 years old….I was unaware of the nature of the offense or that it was a bad crime.”
    In order to bring charges of rape in most Mexican states, the law requires that the girl prove that she is a virgin, and that the charge of statutory rape be dropped if the rapist wishes to marry his victim.
    Of course, this dirty little secret is never talked about by our politicians, when discussing the issue of illegal immigration nor is the impact that such an attitude could have on this nation by offering amnesty to millions of Mexican nationals.
    The next time someone tells you that illegal immigration is a ‘victimless crime,’ remind them of the children whose lives will never be the same.
    Until our politicians gain the courage to actually defend our border…Keep your children close!

  • Avatar
    Grandma
    June 17, 2008 at 11:31 pm

    Evelyn posted: In fact, deportation or removal proceedings are actually conducted in civil court, not criminal court.
    My goodness Evelyn. You seem to think you know more than I do. A legal assistant for the US Attorney’s Office in a border state for 10 years, who sees this day in and day out. Deportation and removal proceedings are held in immigration court. Immigration judges decide whether or not a person is to be deported. Someone who has been arrested for an immigration crime whether it be an EWI (Section 8, 1325), a misdemeanor, or a 1326a (a felony) or a 1326b1 or b2, an aggravated felony with more jail time, is arrested, booked, fingerprinted, shackeled, taken to court, and goes through all the criminal proceedings of a criminal. If an illegal is picked up and has no criminal history, there was a time they were sent directly to immigration court (your description of civil court) but that’s not the case anymore because most of the border states are prosecuting the EWIs, misdemeanors. Once they get their day in court, and they’re sentenced, THEN THEY GO TO AN IMMIGRATION JUDGE IF THEY HAVE NO PRIOR DEPORT ORDER. The immigration judge issues a deportation order and if they come back they are charged with a harsher crime. Please don’t tell me I don’t know what I’m talking about when I deal with this every day.

  • Avatar
    Evelyn
    June 18, 2008 at 2:58 am

    (edited by the moderator)
    ‘Civil Penalty’, is the key word through out the post that you have so graciously provided to shoot down the very lie you are trying to defend.
    ~~~
    The following is the definition of ‘Civil Penalty:’
    Encyclopedia: Civil penalty
    civil penalty or civil fine is a term used to describe when a state entity or a government agency seeks monetary relief against an individual as restitution for wrongdoing by the individual. The wrongdoing is typically defined by a codification of legislation, regulations, and decrees. The civil fine is not considered to be a criminal punishment, because it is primarily sought in order to compensate the state for harm done to it, rather than to punish the wrongful conduct. For example, if a person were to dump toxic waste in a state park, the state would have the same right to seek to recover the cost of cleaning up the mess as would a private landowner, and to bring the complaint to a court of law, if necessary.
    Civil penalties occupy a strange place in some legal systems – because they are not criminal penalties, the state need not meet a burden of proof that is “beyond a reasonable doubt”; but because the action is brought by the government, and some civil penalties can run into the millions of dollars, it would be uncomfortable to subject citizens to them by a burden of proof that is merely a “preponderance of the evidence.” Therefore, the assessment of most civil penalties requires a finding of “clear and convincing evidence” before a civil defendant will be held liable. A defendant may well raise excuses, justifications, affirmative defenses, and procedural defenses. An administrative law judge or hearing officer may oversee the proceedings and render a judgment.
    ~~~
    Your evidence states the following:
    VIII – GENERAL PENALTY PROVISIONS
    U.S. Code as of: 01/03/05
    Section 1325. Improper entry by alien
    (b) Improper time or place; ‘CIVIL PENALTY’
    Any alien who is apprehended while entering (or attempting to
    enter) the United States at a time or place other than as
    designated by immigration officers shall be subject to a
    ‘CIVIL PENALTY’ of –
    (1) at least $50 and not more than $250 for each such entry (or
    attempted entry); or
    (2) twice the amount specified in paragraph (1) in the case of
    an alien who has been previously subject to a ‘CIVIL PENALTY’ under
    this subsection.
    ‘CIVIL PENALTIES’ under this subsection are in addition to, and not in lieu of, any criminal or other civil penalties that may be imposed.
    ~~~
    The evidence I submitted basically stated the same thing:
    “immigration is not a crime, its a civil violation. That is to say, unauthorized immigration to the United States, is not punishable through the U.S. criminal code.”
    “In fact, deportation or removal proceedings are actually conducted in civil court, not criminal court.”
    ~~~
    Now even a child of 8 knows that forged documents, murder, rape, drunk driving, and many other less serious offences are crimes. So before you try to put words in my mouth, I stated:
    “Migrating is not a crime in America it is an Administrative Issue. Therefore Immigrants are not criminals.”
    ~~~
    By the way, nowhere in your article or mine does it mention the word
    “misdemeanor.” Your article does mention some crimes that may be considered misdemeanors. However, I only referred to migration by immigrants whose presence in the U.S. is unauthorized. Not other crimes.
    ~~~
    Now that you have made a total fool of yourself let me give you some advice. Before you post evidence make sure you are not blowing a hole in your own Azz. OUCH! LOL!

  • Avatar
    Evelyn
    June 18, 2008 at 3:42 am

    “Well Evelyn, every person, be he citizen or illegl alien who obtains work has to fill out an Form I-9, Employment Eligibility Verification form swearing that he is eligible to work, and has to present a Social Security card”
    Some do, but most dont. You see Horace there is a little thing given to immigrants who are not authorized to work called the ITIN number. Employers have many ways of getting around filing I-9’s calling it contract labor is just one. That is another reason CIR is needed so employers have to pay all workers the same wages.
    ~~~
    IRS gives taxpayer identification numbers (ITIN) to undocumented workers
    This from The South Florida Sun Sentinel (Ft Lauderdale), Undocumented workers must report income, by Allan Wernick
    The law requires undocumented immigrants to report income to the Internal Revenue Service under the same rules that apply to other earners. If you want to file a tax return but don’t have a Social Security number, you can use an Individual Taxpayer Identification Number as a substitute. An ITIN is a nine-digit number used for tax purposes. You get the number by including IRS Form W-7 the first time you file a tax return.
    Many undocumented immigrants want an ITIN for banking and other purposes. The IRS now issues ITINs to undocumented immigrants only if they file a tax return. Given this rule, workers who worked ‘off the books’ and didn’t file in the past might want to consider filing this year.
    According to the IRS, to get an ITIN you must have a legal obligation to file a return. You have that obligation if you earned $400 or more as an independent contractor. Examples of an independent contractor are day laborers doing yard work for different homeowners each day and part-time housekeepers working, as needed, cleaning apartments.
    Regular employees (as opposed to independent contractors) have an obligation to report income if they earned at least $8,200, though the amount might vary depending on age and other factors.
    If you earned very little last year, you might be able to report your income without having to pay taxes. You could file a return, get an ITIN and not have to pay a cent to the government.
    An ITIN alone does not authorize you to work in the United States. Still, some employers hire undocumented immigrants and report their workers’ income using the ITIN.
    According to tax expert Eileen Glassman of the Newburgh, N.Y., accounting firm of Goldstein, Karlewicz and Goldstein, LLP, if you or your employer reported income using an ITIN number, then later you get a valid Social Security card, you can ask the U.S. Social Security Administration to reconcile (put together) any retirement accounts that you create.
    You are getting a good education on this forum free Horace!!

  • Avatar
    Grandma
    June 18, 2008 at 10:21 pm

    Evelyn posted: The evidence I submitted basically stated the same thing:
    “immigration is not a crime, its a civil violation. That is to say, unauthorized immigration to the United States, is not punishable through the U.S. criminal code.”
    “In fact, deportation or removal proceedings are actually conducted in civil court, not criminal court.”
    You can continue to spin this anyway you want. I had to take a file to one of my attorneys at the US courthouse today. I went into the courtroom and there were quite a few illegals standing before the Federal Criminal Judge. All arrested for “immigration” (your word), Illegal Entry (my word). They wore orange jump suits, they were handcuffed and shackeled, they stood before a Federal US Judge. They are charged with a misdemeanor. “unauthorized immigration to the United States, is not punishable through the U.S. criminal code.” Sorry, but they were being punished thru the US criminal code for violating the immigration laws and they will be spending another night in jail before they go to an immigration judge (the civil proceeding) and then deported only to come back tomorrow.

  • Avatar
    Liquidmicro
    June 19, 2008 at 12:29 am

    Some confuse misdemeanor and felony criminal acts with that of civil and criminal acts. To put it in an even more simplistic context; if I am the one going against you in court, it is civil, if the government is taking you to court, it is criminal.
    In civil law, a private party (a corporation or individual person) files the lawsuit and becomes the plaintiff. In criminal law, the litigation is always filed by the government, who is called the prosecution.
    Criminal law is much better known to laymen than civil law. They often misapply principles from criminal law to situations in civil (e.g., tort) law, which results in their misunderstanding.
    Illegally entering the US is a crime. Unlawful presence is not a federal crime. However, it is a removable offense under the Immigration Act. As illegal immigrants are not citizens of the U.S., they do not have the same rights as a U.S. citizen. Their deportation hearing takes place before an immigration judge. Since the penalty is deportation and/or a fine and/or jail time, many people think of the Immigration Court as a civil court. In fact, the Immigration Court is a criminal court, as it is the government prosecuting the offense.
    Under federal law, illegally entering the country is a misdemeanor punishable by a fine and up to six months in prison for a first time. A second offense carries up to two years. If an immigrant has been prosecuted and deported and then sneaks back into the country, he can be charged with a felony punishable by up to two years behind bars. Those with criminal records can get 10 to 20 years.
    Many of those who give political shelter to these illegal aliens attempt to claim that many of those Illegal’s are not actually criminals, as they entered the country legally, but failed to leave when required to do so. This is a false claim. Overstay Your Visa and I-94
    If you stay in the U.S. longer than your Visa, I-94 and/or grace period (180 days after expiration) allow, you face:
    a) Future denial of visas;
    b) Bans from re-entry;
    c) Detention and deportation as an illegal alien; a now criminal act.

  • Avatar
    Evelyn
    June 19, 2008 at 3:05 am

    Grandma
    This is what I found on Operation Predator.
    It is ashame this type of trash exists.
    Operation Predator is a comprehensive initiative designed to protect young people from child pornographers, alien smugglers, human traffickers, and other predatory criminals.
    You can view the names and stories here.
    http://www.ice.gov/pi/predator/newsreleases.htm
    06/18/08
    Eugene, OR
    Oregonian sentenced on federal charges of possessing child pornography
    06/18/08
    San Diego, CA
    Two San-Diego-area men sentenced for possessing child pornography
    06/17/08
    St Thomas, U.S. Virgin Islands
    USVI man pleads guilty to possession of child pornograhy
    06/17/08
    San Juan, PR
    ICE arrests Puerto Rican man for sexually enticing a minor
    06/16/08
    Miami, FL
    Cuba deports ICE ‘Most Wanted’ fugitive sought on sex tourism charges in U.S.
    California man due in Miami federal courtroom today
    06/06/08
    Des Moines, IA
    IlIowa man sentenced to 26 years in federal prison for child pornography crimes
    06/03/08
    Springfield, IL
    Illinois man charged with possessing, distributing child pornography
    06/03/08
    Detroit, MI
    Michigan man indicted in videoing of his child exploitation
    05/29/08
    Los Angeles, CA
    Ex-Marine convicted of using drugs and force to have sex with young girls in Cambodia
    05/22/08
    Baltimore, MD
    Columbia man pleads guilty to possession of child pornography
    05/20/08
    Denver, CO
    Colorado man sentenced to 7 years in federal prison for possessing child porn
    05/20/08
    Midland, TX
    ICE special agents arrest college professor on child pornography charges
    05/19/08
    Urbana, IL
    Michigan child sex predator receives 20-year prison sentence
    05/16/08
    Portland, OR
    Former Portland area Boy Scout leader sentenced on sex charges
    05/15/08
    South Bend, IN
    Indiana man indicted in child exploitation, pornography
    05/14/08
    Boise, ID
    Former Idaho high school teacher sentenced on child pornography charges stemming from ICE probe
    05/12/08
    San Diego, CA
    Special education teacher sentenced to 36 months on child pornography charges
    05/09/08
    Long Island, NY
    ICE New York Agents arrest fugitive sexual predator in Long Island
    05/08/08
    Washington, IN
    Indiana man indicted in nationwide investigation of Internet child pornography trade
    05/08/08
    Lyon, France
    U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement arrests suspected child abuser focus of INTERPOL global appeal
    05/06/08
    Las Vegas, NV
    Former teacher sentenced to 97 months on child pornography charges
    05/06/08
    Lyon, France
    INTERPOL and ICE seek help identifying international child predator
    05/02/08
    Dayton, OH
    Ohio pediatrician pleads guilty to receiving child pornography
    04/25/08
    Baltimore, MD
    Baltimore man sentenced to 14 years in prison for distributing child pornography on the Internet
    04/22/08
    Oakland, CA
    Accused California sex tourist added to ICE ‘most wanted’ list
    04/08/08
    San Antonio, TX
    San Antonio man sentenced to 8 years for possessing child pornography
    04/07/08
    San Antonio, TX
    San Antonio club bouncer sentenced to 6 years for possessing child porn
    04/04/08
    Baltimore, MD
    ICE passes 100th-arrest milestone in Operation Predator in Maryland
    04/03/08
    El Paso, TX
    Cross-border sex tourist sentenced to 110 months in federal prison
    04/02/08
    Springfield, IL
    Illinois man charged with attempting to entice minor, possessing child pornography
    03/27/08
    Hartford, CT
    Stonington, Conn., man arrested on pornography charges
    03/21/08
    Minneapolis, MN
    More child pornography charges added to Minnesotan’s indictment
    03/17/08
    Spokane, WA
    Federal inmate from Spokane sentenced to additional 20 years in prison on child pornography charges
    03/17/08
    Portland, OR
    Washingtonian charged with traveling out-of-state to have sex with children
    03/12/08
    Washington, DC
    New York man sentenced on child pornography and obstruction of justice
    03/11/08
    Dallas, TX
    Federal jury convicts Texas man of possessing, transporting child pornography
    03/11/08
    Lansing, MI
    Lansing man sentenced to 120 years in prison for child pornography crimes
    03/10/08
    Milwaukee, WI
    Wisconsin man gets 10 years in prison for arranging sex with 8-year-old girl
    03/07/08
    Fargo, ND
    Fargo man pleads guilty to possessing child pornography
    03/07/08
    Pensacola, FL
    Pensacola man arrested for enticing a child to engage in sexual activity
    03/07/08
    Miami, FL
    Former CBS technician sentenced to 10 years’ imprisonment for enticing a child to engage in sexual activity
    02/22/08
    St. Croix, VI
    U.S. Virgin Islands man sentenced to 11 years for possession of child pornography
    02/20/08
    Dallas, TX
    Dallas man sentenced to 10 years on child pornography conviction
    02/20/08
    San Juan, PR
    ICE arrests man wanted in Florida for possession of child pornography
    02/20/08
    Richmond, VA
    ICE, Virginia Attorney General announce arrests of 171 criminal alien sex offenders in Virginia
    02/12/08
    Boise, ID
    Former Idaho high school teacher and tennis coach pleads guilty to child pornography charges stemming from ICE probe
    02/12/08
    Wilmington, DE
    ICE arrests Air Force Sergeant on child pornography charges
    02/08/08
    Brownsville, TX
    Former fire investigator sentenced to 25 years for producing, possessing child porn in Texas
    02/08/08
    San Antonio, TX
    San Antonio man sentenced to 10 years for possessing child pornography
    01/30/08
    Orlando, FL
    Orlando predator who victimized more than 50 children and recorded sexual acts is sentenced to more than 17 years in prison
    01/25/08
    Ft. Pierce, FL
    Indiantown man sentenced today to 90 months in prison for conspiracy to produce child pornography following an ICE and Martin County Sheriff’s Office investigation
    01/24/08
    Riverside, CA
    Riverside County man sentenced to 20 years for traveling to sexually abuse a 7-year-old boy
    01/22/08
    New Haven, CT
    Storrs man pleads guilty to receipt and distribution of child pornography
    01/22/08
    Bismarck, ND
    North Dakota man indicted for producing, possessing child pornography
    01/14/08
    San Diego, CA
    Special education teacher charged in ICE Internet child pornography probe
    01/14/08
    Great Falls, MT
    Montana resident sentenced to 85 years in prison for making and possessing child pornography
    01/11/08
    Bismarck, ND
    North Dakota man sentenced to more than 21 years for child sexual exploitation
    01/10/08
    Anchorage, AK
    Anchorage man sentenced on federal obscenity charges
    01/10/08
    Miami, FL
    Florida men sentenced for production and receipt of child pornography following ICE and Martin County Sheriff’s Office investigation
    01/04/08
    Tacoma, WA
    Two Washington state men charged in child pornography cases
    01/03/08
    Portland, OR
    Beaverton Boy Scout leader pleads guilty to enticing minor to meet him for sex
    01/03/08
    Fairfax, VA
    ICE D.C. Fugitive Operations Team arrests fugitive sexual predator

  • Avatar
    Evelyn
    June 19, 2008 at 3:37 am

    It seems Deborah Schurman-Kauflin and her ‘Dark Side of Immigration” is another pack of lies.
    > 14. ’The Dark Side of Illegal Immigration: Nearly One Million Sex > > Crimes Committed by Illegal Immigrants In The United States ’. > > http://www.drdsk.com/articleshtml I’m sorry to see Deborah Schurman-Kauflin (Ph.D. in Interdisciplinary Studies, 1999 from The Union Institute & University’s Ph.D. program for professionals with full-time jobs, http://www.tui.edu/news/network/NETWORK_sum2001.pdf page 35) used as a source. Her methods are wildly extrapolative, she has not done a solid professional job of statistical analysis (not even any discussion of uncertainties). She has a blurb on her site about how she “has been studying serial killers for 20 years,” but her photo looks surprisingly young for someone with a PhD working in her field for twenty years. That’s because her description is designed to mislead without actually lying. In fact, she wrote something a little closer to the truth for TUI’s newsletter’ she wrote that she “has been studying serial killers since she was 14 years old. The daughter of a psychologist, Schurman-Kauflin found herself engrossed in her mother’s books and later pursued an undergraduate degree in criminal justice. While working as a homicide investigator, Schurman-Kauflin learned of The Union Institute, designed her program to pursue her interest in serial murder investigation, completed her Ph.D., and currently works as a criminal profiler.” This is why it is so difficult to find any credentials for her. This is also very likely why her stats don’t include analysis.
    Interestingly, “More than half of the arrests made as part of Operation Predator have been arrests of foreign national sex offenders whose crimes make them removable from the United States. To date, more than 450 of these predators have been deported. Their crimes include a Los Angeles man who repeatedly molested his own daughter and an Austrian-national soccer coach convicted of repeatedly fondling a mentally impaired minor.” Most of them were not illegal immigrants from Mexico, and some were not illegal at all, although one can enter the US under false pretenses (not reveal a criminal history, for example), at which time one becomes “illegal.” Then there is this page on “illegal immigrant crime” from Colorado Media Matters: http://colorado.mediamatters.org/items/200702160002
    The government’s General Accounting Office found that its sample of 55,322 incarcerated illegal aliens had been arrested for (over the years – many had multiple arrests) 700,000 crimes altogether [http://www.gao.gov/new.items/d05646r.pdf], of which 12 percent were sex-related (84,000 crimes. That’s not in one year, that’s for all incarcerated illegal aliens GAO could identify as such – so not Nearly One Million Sex Crimes, but 8.4 percent of Dr. Deborah Schurman-Kauflin’s number. Now if we estimate that the average time served is going to be 5 years, it takes 50 years to get to 840,000 at a constant rate – yeah, I know that’s a simplification – there were fewer in the past and there will “probably” be more in the future – so Dr. Deborah Schurman-Kauflin could possibly have gotten that number by extrapolating over all illegal immigrants for the last century… just a thought.)
    Here is another de-bunking of the same outlandish claim. This one contains a bit of humor, like Deborah’s math problem. LOL!
    Dear Mexican,
    I’ve been on sex-offender registry Web sites a couple of times, and it seems there are a lot of names ending with -ez. Is there an elevated rate of sexual deviancy amongst Mexicans? If so, why?
    —El Güero Guapísimo
    Dear Super-Handsome Light-Skinned Gabacho,
    Methinks you doth look for brownies too much. But I don’t blame you. Turn on the television and radio, and you’re likely to hear anti-immigrant pendejos screech about how Mexicans will rape you while stealing your job and playing banda music really loudly. You’ll probably hear them invoke the work of Dr. Deborah Schurman-Kauflin. Her 2006 paper “The Dark Side of Illegal Immigration: Nearly 1 Million Sex Crimes Committed by Illegal Immigrants in the United States” came to some startling conclusions, not least of which were that there are 240,000 illegal immigrant sex offenders in this country, and that 93 of these cretins enter this country daily. Know-nothing politicians and even the House Homeland Security Committee’s Subcommittee on Investigations have cited Schurman-Kauflin’s paper in arguing against amnesty.
    Schurman-Kauflin based her findings on a 2005 Government Accountability Office survey that showed 2 percent of illegals in federal, local or state prisons had committed a sex crime. She then applied that percentage to the illegal immigrant population at large. Voila! Instant endemic perversity! This statistical sleight-of-hand, however, withers by employing the very stats she uses. GAO data for 2003 (the most recent year available) showed about 308,000 criminal aliens (legal as well as illegal immigrants) were in American prisons; they constitute about 3 percent of the nation’s 12 million illegal immigrants. If only 2 percent of incarcerated illegals committed a sex crime, then it’s intellectually misleading to arrive at the 240,000 figure, ¿qué no?
    For the Mexican, a more telling number in determining sexual deviancy amongst an ethnic group is the percentage of criminals arrested for such crimes. So, let’s go to the scoreboard: In 2003, gabachos incarcerated for sex crimes represented about 18 percent of all gabacho inmates in state prisons; perverted Hispanics, conversely, made up just 11 percent (strangely enough, the U.S. Department of Justice doesn’t keep the same statistics for federal prisons). According to this comparison, gabachos are more likely as a group to sexually assault you than Mexicans—but betcha you won’t hear Lou Dobbs repeat that factoid ad nauseam.

  • Avatar
    Evelyn
    June 19, 2008 at 2:02 pm

    Grandma
    I dont think I know more then you or anyone else, however it does seem I am better informed than you. That is unfortunate because of the position you hold that can affect the lives of many human beings.
    Every day we see many articles (like the one that will follow my post) that show the abuses immigrants suffer at the hands of gov. employees. I believe these abuses occur because people who are employed by our tax dollars are misinformed, like you, or bias (anti-immigrant.)
    Now that you have had opportunity to view this code firsthand and how it is written with the words ‘civil penalty’ throughout is not reason to accuse me of trying to ‘spin’ facts. I did not word this code and I did not write the code.
    Code at following site:
    http://caselaw.lp.findlaw.com/scripts/ts_search.pl?title=8&sec=1325
    Liquid and Grandma
    Illegal Immigrants Have Constitutional Rights
    by WM H.
    April 12, 2006 07:14 PM EDT (Updated: December 06, 2007 10:58 AM EST)
    Do Illegal Immigrants Have Constitutional Rights
    I made a comment taking exception to another author’s claim that illegal immigrants have no rights. I suggested that it is important to distinguish between constitutional rights and privileges reserved to citizens. The responses to my comment indicate that a great many people do not know what their constitutionally protected rights are.
    The following comes from http://www.slate.com/id/1008367/
    “……..the Bill of Rights applies to everyone, even illegal immigrants. So an immigrant, legal or illegal, prosecuted under the criminal code has the right to due process, a speedy and public trial, and other rights protected by the Fifth and Sixth Amendments. This fact sheet from the National Lawyers Guild outlines a host of rights afforded to immigrants and citizens alike.
    (There are a few rights reserved for citizens. Among them are the right to vote, the right to hold most federal jobs, and the right to run for political office.)”
    The following is taken from National Lawyers Guild website:
    http://www.nlg.org/resources/kyr/kyr_english.htm
    I. What rights do I have?
    Whether or not you’re a citizen, you have these constitutional rights:
    The Right to Remain Silent. The Fifth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution gives every person the right not to answer questions asked by a police officer or government agent.
    The Right to be Free from “Unreasonable Searches and Seizures”. The Fourth Amendment is supposed to protect your privacy. Without a warrant, police or government agents may not search your home or office without your consent, and you have the right to refuse to let them in. They can enter and search without a warrant in an emergency. New laws have expanded the government’s authority to conduct surveillance. It is possible that your e-mail, cell and other telephone calls, and conversations in your home, office, car or meeting place are being monitored without your knowledge.
    The Right to Advocate for Change. The First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution protects the rights of groups and individuals who advocate changes in laws, government practices, and even the form of government. However, the INS can target non-citizens for deportation because of their First Amendment activities, as long as it could deport them for other reasons.
    Note the italics of the last statement. We are all aware that INS is not actively pursuing every illegal immigrant in this country but clearly they can single out individuals who are engaged in exercising their rights.
    The legal protections afforded by the constitution do not apply to simple deportation proceedings.
    Once again from http://www.slate.com/id/1008367/
    But immigration proceedings are matters of administrative law, not criminal law. (As a result, the consequence of violating your immigration status is not jail but deportation.) And Congress has nearly full authority to regulate immigration without interference from the courts. Because immigration is considered a matter of national security and foreign policy, the Supreme Court has long held that immigration law is largely immune from judicial review. Congress can make rules for immigrants that would be unacceptable if applied to citizens.
    In conclusion, while in this country, illegal immigrants are covered by all the rights guaranteed by the Bill of Rights. Exercising those rights may subject them to deportation because of their alien status. Additional laws apply if the illegal immigrant is suspected of being a terrorist but that is not the subject I am attempting to address.
    When illegal entry is treated as a matter of criminal law, instead of being expelled through an administrative proceeding, those accused have the right to a jury trial and all the rules of evidence apply. The government is burdened with “proof beyond a reasonable doubt.” Imagine the cost and the caseload.

  • Avatar
    Evelyn
    June 19, 2008 at 2:05 pm

    National Lawyers Guild
    Society of American Law Teachers—SALT—and National Lawyers Guild—NLG—Joint Statement on ICE Immigration Raids and Criminal Immigration Enforcement
    Friday, June 6, 2008, 07:48 AM
    Society of American Law Teachers—SALT—and National Lawyers Guild—NLG—Joint Statement on ICE Immigration Raids and Criminal Immigration Enforcement
    June 6, 2008
    Contact: Hazel Weiser, SALT Executive Director, 631 650 2310, hweiser@saltlaw.org
    Marjorie Cohn, NLG President, 619 374 6923, marjorie@tjsl.edu
    On May 12, 2008, the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement Agency (ICE), now a part of the Department of Homeland Security, conducted the largest single-site immigration raid in U.S. history at Agriprocessors, a meatpacking plant in Postville, Iowa. Postville is the latest in a pattern of raids that has intensified in the past three years. With the help of state and local law enforcement, ICE arrested 389 workers, most of them from Guatemala and Mexico, nearly a third of all residents living in the town. The ICE raids came coincidentally after Agriprocessors had been issued 39 citations for alleged violations of state workplace safety and health standards, and after efforts to organize plant workers by the United Food and Commercial Workers Union, according to Iowa newspapers.
    In an unprecedented move, ICE criminally charged 302 of the workers with aggravated ID theft and/or for using false social security numbers. In a matter of days, with the workers held at various detention centers, ICE resolved the fate of most of these workers: 297 of these men and women pled guilty and were sentenced to prison and subsequent deportation. The uncharacteristic speed and efficiency of these proceedings left workers without adequate opportunity to consult with lawyers as they faced hard bargains from prosecutors. Hundreds of children were left not knowing about their parents’ fate. Only 44 workers were released to care for their children. As in past raids, these children are likely to suffer from depression, anxiety, and post-traumatic stress. In contrast to the fate of the workers, so far no one in Agriprocessors’ management has been charged, despite evidence that the company helped workers procure false documents, paid substandard wages, failed to pay overtime, and engaged in other types of grave worker mistreatment.
    SALT and NLG deplore these raids that are creating a moral, legal, and humanitarian crisis in our nation. ICE’s heavy handed enforcement against undocumented workers in the wake of failed immigration reform is shameful. Immigration laws remain completely out of touch with reality, and the absence of labor protection for these workers leaves them vulnerable to exploitation. Under current immigration laws, no more than 10,000 backlogged permanent visas for unskilled workers and 66,000 temporary visas for seasonal workers are available per year, while an estimated 2,000 men, women, and children cross the Southwest border into the U.S. daily. An estimated 12 million undocumented persons live in the U.S. These workers come to the U.S. because of global economic realities that drive them out of their nations where they have no means for even subsistence living, and into low wage jobs in the U.S. While U.S. employers and consumers benefit from this source of cheap labor, undocumented workers and their children bear the brunt of a broken immigration system. The last immigration reform sought to stem the flow of illegal immigrants by sanctioning employers who knowingly hired undocumented workers. Enforcement has been sporadic and arbitrary. The financial incentives to employ workers who will be afraid to complain about substandard working conditions and violations of labor codes governing hours and wages are compelling. Few employers face civil or criminal sanctions for taking advantage of these laborers.
    SALT and NLG also condemn ICE’s decision to criminally charge almost all of the arrested workers when few constitutional guarantees are available to them. Ordinarily, use of false Social Security numbers to engage in otherwise lawful conduct, such as to apply for jobs, is not pursued criminally. This unprecedented shift to criminalize workers for the use or possession of false work documents has not been accompanied by a comparable infusion of constitutional guarantees in the handling of these cases. ICE conducted the investigation leading to the Postville raid with easy-access to immigration databases and employee documents, by relying on informants, and then executed the raid with easily-procured administrative, not criminal, warrants. Thus, the protection of stricter Fourth Amendment search and seizure, Fifth Amendment due process, and Sixth Amendment right to counsel constitutional guarantees that apply to criminal investigations and arrests in judicial proceedings were unavailable to these workers. Moreover, the suppression remedy for illegally seized evidence or coerced confessions is quite limited in immigration proceedings. Overwhelmingly, most workers pled guilty in their criminal cases, and thus, relinquished any possibility of raising a Fourth Amendment challenge in court. These workers waived their Fourth Amendment and other due process guarantees under extreme prosecutorial pressure and with little opportunity for adequate legal representation.
    SALT and NLG are also concerned about the consequences to communities of the involvement of local law enforcement in these raids. Already distrust of police keeps many immigrants from reporting crime, which increases their vulnerability as crime victims and as employees of unscrupulous employers. Moreover, these additional responsibilities drain limited resources and take local police away from their primary duties as community caretakers. Federal immigration enforcement by local police is constitutionally suspect, particularly in the absence of Congressional authorization.
    SALT and NLG, therefore, urge the Department of Homeland Security to halt such raids immediately and to treat those still in detention humanely and in accordance with all due process guarantees available to criminal defendants. If ICE plans to charge workers as criminals, then ICE should procure lawful warrants based on probable cause for future workplace raids. SALT and NLG also call on courts to be vigilant in protecting the constitutional rights of workers and their families affected by the raids, and apply stricter constitutional guarantees when criminal charges are implicated. Congress should also seriously consider the implications of its trade and agricultural subsidies on developing nations and future migration flows. It is irresponsible to ignore the intersections of these policies. SALT and NLG call on Congress to adopt comprehensive immigration reform that offers a path to legalization to workers and their families. Such legislation must include strong labor protections while ensuring family unification.
    Since 1973, the Society of American Law Teachers (SALT) has been an independent organization of law teachers, deans, law librarians, and legal education professionals working to make the profession more inclusive, to enhance the quality of legal education, and to extend the power of legal representation to under-served individuals and communities. http://www.saltlaw.org
    Founded in 1937 as an alternative to the American Bar Association, which did not admit people of color, the National Lawyers Guild is the oldest and largest public interest/human rights bar organization in the United States. Its headquarters are in New York and it has chapters in every state. http://www.nlg.org
    * * *

  • Avatar
    Liquidmicro
    June 19, 2008 at 6:57 pm

    “prosecuted under the criminal code has the right to due process”
    Criminal code is the key words here, meaning: Criminal Code is a compilation of government laws that outline a nation’s laws regarding criminal offenses, and the maximum and minimum punishments that courts can impose upon offenders when such crimes are committed (for example: vandalism, retail theft, theft of property, mob action, criminal trespass).
    Basically Title 18 of the US Code is the Federal Criminal Code for the Nation.
    After which, an “Illegal Immigrant” prosecuted under Federal Code Title 18 or various State Codes (it is presumed the person is an eligible Permanent Resident, authorized Green Card holder, or an Citizen of the USA at the time) See Title 18, Chapter 43, Section 911 – Citizen of the United States; Whoever falsely and willfully represents himself to be a citizen of the United States shall be fined under this title or imprisoned not more than three years, or both, once it is found out that the person is an “Illegal Immigrant” (287(g) status of state authorities) he/she now becomes eligible to be prosecuted under Title 8 of the US Code.
    Now, if the Federal Government, look at the Agriprocessor Raid, imposes charges, then it becomes a Federal Criminal Procedure. Look to those accused of ID Theft (under Title 18). For which they pleaded guilty and were then also found guilty under Title 8, received 5 months in prison (Title 18 – ID Theft) and will be promptly deported upon release (Title 8 – Illegal Entry).
    (The illegal immigrants, most from Guatemala, filed into the courtrooms in groups of 10, their hands and feet shackled. One by one, they entered guilty pleas through a Spanish interpreter, admitting they had taken jobs using fraudulent Social Security cards or immigration documents. Moments later, they moved to another courtroom for sentencing.
    The pleas were part of a deal worked out with prosecutors to avoid even more serious charges. Most immigrants agreed to immediate deportation after they serve five months in prison…If the immigrants did not plead guilty, Mr. Dummermuth said he would try them on felony identity theft charges that carry a mandatory two-year minimum jail sentence. (Violation of Title 18, chapter 43, section 911)
    The federal government calls it Operation Streamline, which calls for mandatory prosecutions and mandatory sentencing for all illegal immigration activity.
    “A group of eight Mexicans stood before Magistrate Judge Charles Pyle in federal court in Tucson on Monday.
    They were dressed in jeans and T-shirts. Their hands were cuffed to chains around their waists. Their ankles were also cuffed. Each was charged with illegal entry into the United States by crossing the border away from the port of entry to avoid inspection.

    On Tuesday, EFE, a Spanish language news agency, reported that a total of 5,187 illegal immigrants from Mexico were processed in the program in the federal court in Tucson from Jan. 14 to June 10.

    On Tuesday, EFE, a Spanish language news agency, reported that a total of 5,187 illegal immigrants from Mexico were processed in the program in the federal court in Tucson from Jan. 14 to June 10.”
    “The legal protections afforded by the constitution do not apply to simple deportation proceedings.”
    “When illegal entry is treated as a matter of criminal law, instead of being expelled through an administrative proceeding, those accused have the right to a jury trial and all the rules of evidence apply.”
    These 2 paragraphs sum up the whole argument. They are referring to 2 different possibilities. The Federal Government is leaning more towards the second now a days, criminal prosecution of all “Illegal Immigrants”, which will effect future possibility of the person to re-enter the USA legally negatively.
    I find it hilarious that you left out Section 1325 (a) of your posting @18 June, 2:58 AM., where it clearly states:
    Section 1325. Improper entry by alien
    Section 1325(a) Improper time or place; avoidance of examination or inspection;
    misrepresentation and concealment of facts
    Any alien who (1) enters or attempts to enter the United States
    at any time or place other than as designated by immigration
    officers, or (2) eludes examination or inspection by immigration
    officers, or (3) attempts to enter or obtains entry to the United
    States by a willfully false or misleading representation or the
    willful concealment of a material fact, shall, for the first
    commission of any such offense, be fined under title 18 or
    imprisoned not more than 6 months, or both, and, for a subsequent
    commission of any such offense, be fined under title 18, or
    imprisoned not more than 2 years, or both.
    Its that Title 18-US Federal Criminal Code, that now makes them criminals.
    A quick summary again in case you missed it the first time:
    * Criminal charges are brought by the states or the federal government against individuals for violation of state or federal criminal codes. Criminal charges can subject someone to jail or prison time, depriving them of their liberty.
    * Civil lawsuits are brought by individuals against other persons for money damages or injunctive relief (namely, getting someone to do something, or stop doing something else), but without the issue of jail or prison time (which can only be administered by the government).
    * Aliens who violate the immigration laws of the United States as found in the Immigration and Nationality Act are subject to removal from the country. Deporting aliens can be accomplished either through summary removal or after running the course of endless litigation before the Department of Justice’s dreaded Executive Office for Immigration Review (EOIR) Immigration Court system. But the only thing that aliens have to fear in this area is deportation, not money damages, and not jail time.
    * Aliens who also happen to violate provisions of the federal criminal code can also be subject to prosecution for their crimes (NOT specific charges of removability) by the U.S. attorneys in Federal District Court (which is what we are beginning to see more of). Popular immigration-related crimes are found in Title 8 of the U.S. Code (section 1325: illegally entering the U.S.; section 1326: alien smuggling).
    Any violation of the law that can land you in jail is a crime, even if the offense is a misdemeanor and not a felony.

  • Avatar
    Grandma
    June 19, 2008 at 8:12 pm

    Evelyn, I’m not going to argue with you because you obviously don’t understand immigration law. Here’s an article on Operation Streamline that has been in effect in my office for quite a while. Other offices are now doing the same thing. While you may think that being in this country illegally is not a crime, you would be wrong. But the constitution guarantees you the absolute right to be wrong.
    Operation Streamline Nets 1,200-Plus Prosecutions in Arizona
    (Tuesday, July 24, 2007)
    Yuma, Ariz. – U.S. Customs and Border Protection Border Patrol’s Yuma, Ariz. sector recently expanded Operation Streamline, which has resulted in the prosecution of more than 1,200 illegal immigrants since the operation began in December 2006.
    Modeled after the highly successful operation that began in the Border Patrol’s Del Rio, Texas, sector in December 2005, the operation targets illegal immigrants apprehended in specific enforcement zones for immediate prosecution for illegal entry. Violators face punishment of up to 180 days in jail. Additionally, deportation procedures are initiated to formally remove the individual once they complete their jail sentence.
    The program provides an added margin of safety for both agents conducting patrol operations in high-traffic areas and illegal immigrants whose lives are put at risk when trying to cross Arizona’s harsh desert or treacherous waterways.
    “What this program does for us is to send a strong message that we are not letting illegal border crossers have a free ride,” said Yuma Sector’s acting Chief Patrol Agent Jeff Calhoon. “We’re not just fingerprinting them and then sending them back. If they cross into the U.S. illegally in a designated zone, they will be prosecuted and will likely face jail time. Then they’ll be sent back to their country of origin.”
    One success for the program has been the number of individuals who have been prosecuted so far this year. Yuma Sector prosecutions have nearly doubled since December with more than 2,800 cases prosecuted, of which a little more than 1,200 are Streamline cases. Nearly 300 of those prosecutions were felony cases against individuals who have criminal histories, have a previous order of removal or are involved in smuggling humans or contraband.

  • Avatar
    Grandma
    June 19, 2008 at 8:22 pm

    From Evelyn:
    Grandma
    This is what I found on Operation Predator.
    It is ashame this type of trash exists.
    Yes, Evelyn, it is a shame this trash exists. The only different between my post and your post is my posted listed illegal aliens who should not be in this country in the first place. As proved by your article, we have enough of our own criminals, we certainly don’t need to import more.

  • Avatar
    Grandma
    June 19, 2008 at 8:38 pm

    For you Evelyn:
    Operation Streamline results ‘striking’
    Illegals face prosecution prior to being deported
    By Jonathon Shacat
    Herald/Review
    Published on Thursday, June 19, 2008
    TUCSON — A group of eight Mexicans stood before Magistrate Judge Charles Pyle in federal court in Tucson on Monday.
    They were dressed in jeans and T-shirts. Their hands were cuffed to chains around their waists. Their ankles were also cuffed. Each was charged with illegal entry into the United States by crossing the border away from the port of entry to avoid inspection.
    They were apprehended by Border Patrol agents last week. Under plea agreements, they were sentenced to time served (about five or six days). Marshals escorted them out of the courtroom and another group of defendants came forward.
    By the end of the 1 1/2 hour hearing, a total of about 70 individuals were sentenced. Some were charged with a more serious offense of illegal entry after deportation. Some were ordered to serve up to 180 days in prison.
    Nearly all of the defendants were Mexicans, while a few were from places like Guatemala or El Salvador. There was only one woman. Many had illegally crossed near Sasabe. But Border Patrol spokesman Rob Daniels said any apprehension made anywhere in the Tucson Sector is subject to prosecution under the program.
    This scenario plays out each week Monday through Friday.
    Daniels said the program is “an enhanced enforcement operation.” It started in January.
    At first, about 40 people a day were being prosecuted. The threshold per day is currently at 70 people.
    The individuals who are prosecuted daily represent only a fraction of the total amount of illegal immigrants who are apprehended by Border Patrol in the Tucson Sector. The intent is to continue to increase the number in the future, he said.
    But Michael O’Brien, chief deputy clerk of the Tucson Division of the U.S. District Court, said, “For the foreseeable future, it would be difficult for us to do more than 100. The biggest problem is prisoner-holding capacity in the courthouse. Right now, there are not any plans to go beyond 100.”
    On Tuesday, EFE, a Spanish language news agency, reported that a total of 5,187 illegal immigrants from Mexico were processed in the program in the federal court in Tucson from Jan. 14 to June 10.
    A representative of the Mexican Consulate attended the hearing in Tucson on Monday to make sure the Mexican nationals who were sentenced received the same amount of time that their lawyers promised them, said Alejandro Ramos Cardoso, spokesman for the Mexican Consulate in Tucson.
    Ramos said three consulate representatives also interviewed the Mexican nationals to make sure their human rights were not violated.
    And, they offered to notify their families in Mexico regarding their situations and help them recover their belongings.
    Cardoso said those individuals who are prosecuted under the program could face other consequences down the road.
    “If there is any kind of immigration reform or anything of that sort, they are going to be left out because they would have a deportation on their record,” he said.
    Operation Streamline, a full-fledged version of the program, was initiated in Del Rio, Texas, in December 2005, expanded to Yuma in December 2006, and further expanded to Laredo, Texas, in October 2007.
    Under Streamline, all illegal immigrants caught crossing the border in designated high-traffic zones are criminally prosecuted before they are deported as part of an administrative process.
    During the state of immigration address on June 9 in Washington, D.C., Homeland Security Secretary Michael Chertoff said the results of Operation Streamline have been “striking.”
    “We have seen significant reductions and apprehensions, a decrease in the recidivism rate of aliens prosecuted under the program, meaning once they get prosecuted, they stop trying to come in again, and a reduction in smuggling — in smuggling organizations and illegal entries in the relevant urban areas,” he said.
    “If you look at apprehensions, you could see a steady decrease from the time we began these initiatives to the present. The reason this works is because these illegal migrants come to realize that violating the law will not simply send them back to try over again, but will require them to actually serve some short period of time in a jail or prison setting, and will brand them as having been violators of the law,” he continued.

  • Avatar
    Evelyn
    June 20, 2008 at 12:04 am

    Grandma
    “Yes, Evelyn, it is a shame this trash exists. The only different between my post and your post is my posted listed illegal aliens who should not be in this country in the first place. As proved by your article, we have enough of our own criminals, we certainly don’t need to import more.”
    I agree this type trash shouldent be in any country, in fact I would go further and say it shouldent exist at all.
    Say, did you notice that many of the Americans in my article were men who were in other countries exploiting children from those countries, including Mexico.
    Like I said, this type trash shouldent exist, but unfortunately it does, in ALL ethnic groups.

  • Avatar
    Evelyn
    June 20, 2008 at 7:18 am

    Grandma
    You should have told me you were referring to Operation Streamline. I had all but forgotten about this pilot program, used sparingly because of cost at about 400 miles of our border. Immigrants caught at these sectors are scapegoated and criminalized by making unlawful entry a misdemeanor.
    A few miles of Texas border use this program, California and New Mexico dont use it at all. Anyone, even an American Citizen should not set foot in AZ. due to their extreme racism. Proud home of the Minuteklan!
    Immigration Prosecutions Hit New High
    Critics Say Increased Use of Criminal Charges Strains System
    WASHINGTON (By Spencer S. Hsu, Washington Post) June 2, 2008
    Federal law enforcement agencies have increased criminal prosecutions of immigration violators to record levels, in part by filing minor charges against virtually every person caught illegally crossing some stretches of the U.S.-Mexico border, according to new U.S. data.
    Officials say the threat of prison and a criminal record is a powerful deterrent, one that is helping drive down illegal immigration along the nearly 2,000-mile frontier between the United States and Mexico. Skeptics say that the government lacks the resources to sustain the strategy on the border and that the effort is diverting resources from more serious crimes such as drug and human smuggling.
    . Since 2005, people other than Mexicans are generally held until removed.
    In testimony to Congress this spring, Homeland Security Secretary Michael Chertoff said Operation Streamline “is a very good program, and we are working to get it expanded across other parts of the border” because “it has a great deterrent effect.” The program is now in place in parts of Texas and Arizona.
    But Melissa Wagoner, a spokeswoman for Sen. Edward M. Kennedy (D-Mass.), said there is a shortage of jail beds and public defenders in areas where the program is operating. “Operation Streamline in its current form already strains the capabilities of the law enforcement system past the breaking point,” she said.
    “This strategy pretty much has it backwards,” he said. “It’s going after desperate people who are crossing the border in search of a better way of life, instead of going after employers who are hiring people who have no right to work in this country.”
    First piloted in December 2005 near Del Rio, Tex., Operation Streamline requires that virtually everyone caught illegally crossing segments of the border be charged with at least a misdemeanor immigration count and jailed until they are brought to court and, if convicted, eventually deported. A conviction jeopardizes any future legal entry to the United States.
    Federal officials credit the program and other measures for contributing to a 20 percent drop in apprehensions of illegal immigrants on the U.S.-Mexico border in 2007, to 859,000. That figure is on track to drop an additional 15 percent this year.
    While apprehension statistics can be misleading — they obviously do not account for border-crossers who evade capture — federal authorities say the decline coincides with a decrease in financial remittances from illegal immigrants in the United States to families in Mexico.
    In areas where it has been applied — which total about 500 miles, or one-fourth of the border — Operation Streamline has slowed border traffic more substantially.
    The number of apprehensions fell by nearly 70 percent in the last quarter of 2008 along a 120-mile stretch near Yuma, Ariz., after the program was phased in between December 2006 and June 2007, and by nearly 70 percent along the 210-mile span near Del Rio. Apprehensions fell 22 percent after Operation Streamline was initiated in October along 171 miles near Laredo, Tex.
    Overall, the number of criminal immigration cases filed by U.S. prosecutors nearly doubled between January and February. They accounted for the majority of new Justice Department prosecutions nationwide in February — about 7,250 out of 13,500 — outnumbering all white-collar, civil rights, environmental and other criminal cases combined.
    The surge in prosecutions accompanies other get-tough immigration-enforcement efforts, such as last month’s raid on a kosher meatpacking plant in Iowa, where federal authorities detained 389 workers; 297 were convicted of immigration-related felonies, mainly using false documents to obtain jobs.
    The prosecution data was collected by the Transactional Records Access Clearinghouse, an independent research organization at Syracuse University that analyzes monthly Justice Department prosecution statistics.
    A Justice spokesman, Dean Boyd, challenged the specifics but not the conclusions of the group’s findings, which are based on data compiled by the department’s Executive Office for U.S. Attorneys. He said some of the increase in prosecutions may be due to improved reporting. The department declined last week to provide its own count of immigration prosecutions.
    Attorney General Michael B. Mukasey said the program has had “great success” in areas with relatively low migrant traffic because the threat of imprisonment and criminal prosecution has sent a “major message” to most border-crossers, “who turn out to be people who are simply looking for work.”
    “It’s worked beautifully. Crime has dropped 76 percent in Del Rio, with the lowest level of illegal crossings they have ever seen,” said Rep. John Culberson, a Houston area Republican who has worked with two border-district Democrats to promote the program. “Law enforcement is simple if you just enforce the law rigorously.”
    But experts warn against exaggerating Operation Streamline’s potential. The crackdown comes amid a softening U.S. economy, which tends to decrease illegal immigration. And migrants and smugglers have responded to past enforcement efforts by moving to more remote areas.
    Mukasey said the program would be much more difficult to expand to high-traffic areas, such as the Tucson sector, where the Border Patrol made 378,000 apprehensions in 2007, nearly half its total. That number is more than three times the total apprehended in the Yuma, Laredo and Del Rio sectors combined.
    In fact, Tucson is emerging as the battleground for Operation Streamline’s “zero tolerance” concept, presenting a case study of the challenges in ramping up the nation’s legal machinery to tackle the estimated 1 million-plus people a year who cross the border illegally or overstay their visas. Authorities there have launched a modified version of the program they hope to expand in coming months.
    John M. Roll, chief judge of the U.S. District Court of Arizona, said that since January, authorities from the Justice and Homeland Security departments and the federal courts have worked closely to increase Operation Streamline-related prosecutions. They began with 40 cases a day, are prosecuting 70 now and hope to reach 100 per day by September.
    In four months this year, the court’s magistrate judges imposed 3,700 sentences for Operation Streamline-related minor offenses, close to the 4,700 petty and misdemeanor cases they handled in all of 2007. The court also handled 2,800 felony cases, mostly immigration-related, in Tucson last year, for a total of about 7,500 cases, making it the nation’s third-busiest.
    Meeting the 100-case-a-day goal would nearly triple the court’s workload, to more than 20,000 cases. But even that effort would address only about 5 percent of the apprehensions made in Tucson last year.
    David Gonzales, the U.S. marshal for Arizona, said the program is swamping federal courthouses and jails.
    “If Streamline was all we were doing, that would be fine. But we also have to deal with all other federal prisoners in southern Arizona and all other prisoners federal agencies bring in,” Gonzales said.
    Other federal officials are more critical, warning that the focus on immigration is distorting the functions of law enforcement and the courts. Several Arizona officials noted that U.S. prosecutors there last year were so short on resources, they chose not to prosecute a number of marijuana seizures of less than 500 pounds, although they later revised the guideline to 20 pounds.
    “We’re concerned about the misdirection of resources,” said Heather Williams, first assistant to the federal public defender of Arizona. Each day her office’s lawyers spend on misdemeanor border-crossing cases, she said, “they’re not talking about a drug case, a sex crime, a murder, assault or any number of white-collar cases — and the same is obviously true of the prosecutors.”
    “This is taking on a life of its own,” she said.
    Williams also warned that the program tests the U.S. legal system’s promise of fairness to the accused. “If we as a U.S. citizen were placed in any other country on the planet, and had to resolve a case in a day that could result in being deported and having a criminal record, we would be outraged, and so would our government,” she said.
    Boyd, the Justice Department spokesman, said the government has not seen decreases in all other types of prosecutions and is increasing resources to support five border-area U.S. attorney’s offices.
    Michael Friel, a spokesman for U.S. Customs and Border Protection, the Homeland Security agency that includes the Border Patrol, said that even if Operation Streamline-related prosecutions near Tucson deter only a few illegal immigrants, that will free up resources that can be deployed elsewhere. He noted that U.S. authorities have been able to expand the program bit by bit since starting with a five-mile stretch near Del Rio.
    “Obviously,” Friel said, “we think it’s proving to be an effective tool as part of a larger strategy to gain effective control of the border.”
    ~~~~~~~
    Tucson- La Coalición de Derechos Humanos call for immediate action to stop the Unites States District Court from transferring the prosecution of migrants under the Arizona Denial Prosecution Initiative, (ADPI) the Tucson Border Patrol Sector’s version of “Operation Streamline,” from the federal courthouse to the detention center located on the Davis Monthan Air Force Base. APDI is an irresponsible, brutal and costly response to the issue of migration, and to now propose to do this behind military walls is contrary to the spirit of public review and accountability.
    Since the mid-1990’s, the U. S government has dramatically increased the prosecution of immigrants apprehended in the Tucson Sector for the federal misdemeanor “illegal entry,” the felony “illegal re-entry,” and a few other immigration-related offenses. (Note: this coincided with the implementation of the “prevention through deterrence” policies, i.e. militarization, that has caused the funneling of migrants through Arizona). During this time and prior to APDI, only 1% of those migrants apprehended in this sector were criminally prosecuted, but the result has been an ever-growing court system and prison bureaucracy. According to David Gonzales, the U. S. Marshal for the State of Arizona, taxpayers have been paying between $9 to $11 million dollars PER MONTH just for the incarceration of these immigrants. The recipient of this money is the private prison corporation Corrections Corporation of America (CCA), which has a checkered past for abuse and corruption. This does not include the costs for the court itself, the judges and their staff, the prosecutors, defense attorneys, marshals, clerks, etc., which has been estimated to be another $10 million per month.
    Gee, no wonder AZ. is going to hell in a basket. All the bad decisions they have made.
    ~~~~~~~~
    Operation Streamline: Stumbling in Arizona?
    “The government has started cracking down on illegal border crossers in the Tucson Sector. But limited resources in Arizona’s federal-court system are blocking the goal of prosecuting everyone who enters the country illegally.
    The Border Patrol has referred 757 cases to authorities since the government began prosecuting illegal crossers in the Tucson area on Jan. 14. Up to 42 are prosecuted daily, and there are plans to prosecute up to 100 cases a day in the busiest human-smuggling area on the border.
    But federal courts in Tucson can hold only 60 immigration defendants a day, and even if they could handle the 100-a-day workload, that amounts to prosecuting only 10 percent of those arrested by the Border Patrol.”
    The paragraph below this article just reinforces the fact that unauthorized immigration is still not viewed as a criminal offence except if apprehended within these sectors, and even then this pilot is not always implemented because of cost. Unauthorized Immigrants living within the U.S. should not be called criminals unless one can prove they have committed a criminal offence.
    (Others note, historically, immigration violations have been processed by U.S. administrative courts. Criminalizing illegal immigration while turning a blind eye to employers who provide the jobs that lure migrants makes for good election-year politics but poor policy, said T.J. Bonner, president of the National Border Patrol Council.)

  • Avatar
    laura
    June 20, 2008 at 11:17 pm

    I am struck by the fact that people like “Grandma” seem to think that if someone is wearing an orange jumpsuit and has been shackled, they must be a criminal.
    Right.
    Just like many Germans thought if someone was wearing a yellow “Jew” star, they must be preying on Germans.
    I suppose in the 1850s Americans thought if someone had black skin, they must be a slave. And those that wore shackles and were auctioned off, deserved this treatment, because they were the inferior race.
    It is the little henchmen like “Grandma,” who admire the power that crushes their brothers underfoot, that make slavery, torture, and concentration camps possible.

  • Avatar
    Liquidmicro
    June 21, 2008 at 3:50 pm

    “‘Civil Penalty’, is the key word through out the post that you have so graciously provided to shoot down the very lie you are trying to defend.”
    You always fail to complete the information, its like you are hiding it hoping that nobody will check. Here is the paragraph of ‘Civil Penalties’ that you left out:
    In some cases, a civil penalty may be supplemented by other legal process, including administrative sanctions or even criminal charges, and their respective appeals. For example, failure to pay a fine assessed for a traffic code violation may result in administrative suspension of a driver’s license, and further driving after suspension may be a criminal offense. On the other hand, a minimal case may be “put on file”, or otherwise suspended for a period during which the defendant may be required to avoid further violations, or carry out specific duties (such as making repairs or restitution, or attending supplemental education), after which the matter is dismissed.
    ‘Civil Penalties’ are in addition to the Title 18 penalties (which usually carry a penalty of jail time, not monetary fines), however, when was the last time the Government collected monies for ‘Civil Penalties’ regarding “Illegal Aliens”?

  • Avatar
    Evelyn
    June 22, 2008 at 3:38 am

    Grandma
    It is also your constitutional right to believe whatever you want, even if it isn’t true.

  • Avatar
    Evelyn
    June 22, 2008 at 5:14 am

    Even when confronted with evidence that being in this country illegally is not a crime some people still choose to believe it is, and that is fine. If anyone still has any doubts here is another article explaining the issue in layman’s terms.
    What part of ILLEGAL do you not understand?
    You know its your favorite comment. You’ve seen it posted on every message board from the New York Times to the Millwood Gazette.
    Hmm… What is ALL the fuss about? I mean it must be something big if everyone is always writing in these CAPITAL LETTERS! Well it turns out that these are not criminals per se. As they have not committed a criminal violation, it is a CIVIL offense.
    Being illegally present in the U.S. has always been a civil, not criminal, violation of the INA, and subsequent deportation and associated administrative processes are civil proceedings.
    Immigration Enforcement Within the United States
    Congressional Research Service ˜ The Library of Congress:
    Types of Immigration Enforcement
    The INA includes both criminal and civil components, providing both for
    criminal charges (e.g., alien smuggling, which is prosecuted in the federal courts) and
    for civil violations (e.g., lack of legal status, which may lead to removal through a
    separate administrative system in the Department of Justice).32 Being illegally
    present in the U.S. has always been a civil, not criminal, violation of the INA, and
    subsequent deportation and associated administrative processes are civil
    proceedings.33 For instance, a lawfully admitted nonimmigrant alien may become
    deportable if his visitor’s visa expires or if his student status changes. Criminal
    violations of the INA, on the other hand, include felonies and misdemeanors and are
    prosecuted in federal district courts.
    http://assets.opencrs.com/rpts/RL33351_20060406.pdf

  • Avatar
    Horace
    June 22, 2008 at 8:59 am

    “I am struck by the fact that people like “Grandma” seem to think that if someone is wearing an orange jumpsuit and has been shackled, they must be a criminal.
    Right.
    Just like many Germans thought if someone was wearing a yellow “Jew” star, they must be preying on Germans.”
    Let’s just say that it’s a hint. More references to the holocaust. The rest of the world doesn’t seem to recognize arrests and deportations as comparable. Only self-serving rationalists with an agenda of open borders and working to keep their personal friends and family members from deportation seem to respect this spin on history.

  • Avatar
    Liquidmicro
    June 22, 2008 at 12:44 pm

    “Immigration law is extremely complex, and is constantly changing. There are criminal and civil violations of immigration law. Civil violations include, for example, illegal presence and failure to depart after the expiration of a temporary visa. Criminal violations include illegal entry, re-entry after deportation, and failure to depart after an order of removal.”
    From the National Immigration Forum
    http://www.immigrationforum.org/documents/TheDebate/EnforcementLocalPolice/Backgrounder-StateLocalEnforcement.pdf
    Civil violations include, for example, illegal presence and failure to depart after the expiration of a temporary visa.
    Criminal violations include illegal entry, re-entry after deportation, and failure to depart after an order of removal.
    A removal order can also be a Civil violation if the person was not aware of the order entered against them. However, it does not remove the Criminal violation of illegal entry or illegal re-entry after a deportation.
    Here is the same info from the AZStar.
    http://www.azstarnet.com/sn/border/125794
    Penalties
    Current law
    ● Sanctions against employers who knowingly hire illegal immigrants:
    Civil violations
    l First offense: Fines of $250 to $2,000 per violation.
    l Second offense: $2,000 to $5,000.
    l Third offense: $3,000 to $10,000.
    l Improperly filling out I-9 forms verifying employee eligibility: $100 to $1,000 per form.
    (Fines also subject to increase based on escalation clause pegged to inflation.)
    Criminal violations
    l Those who engage in a pattern or practice of knowingly hiring illegal entrants: Fine of up to $3,000 per entrant and up to six months in prison.
    Penalties for illegal immigrants:
    l Unlawful entry: A criminal misdemeanor subject to six months in prison. Up to two years in prison for subsequent offenses.
    l Unlawful re-entry after deportation: A felony, up to 10 years in prison.
    l Overstaying visas: A civil violation. Ineligible to return to the United States for at least three years for overstays of more than six months. Barred from returning for at least 10 years for overstays of more than a year.
    The problem is confounded when Evelyn is talking about a small minority of visa over stayers being civil offenses and trying to incorrectly state that ‘ALL’ “Illegal Immigrants” residing within the USA are only in violation of a Civil offense, when the rest are talking about the majority of “Illegal Immigrants”, who crossed our borders through “Illegal Entry”, which is a Criminal offense.
    Your continuous claims of:It is also your constitutional right to believe whatever you want, even if it isn’t true. Is this your way of self righteousness? Since only you can ever be the one who is correct. Sorry to burst your bubble, but until you can clearly open your eyes to the entire picture, you will be blinded by your own ignorance of bliss. Lost in your own mind. You, at any point in time have only been partially correct, and that is up to a certain point and/or for a minor issue. Maybe you should be clarifying your statements instead of using the entire brush, the devil is in the details. Maybe you should also stop with your vile hate filled name calling, this might also clear your ineptitude of your position.

  • Avatar
    Evelyn
    June 23, 2008 at 2:37 am

    Liquid
    I choose to ignore your posts because you have nothing of substance to contribute. Your ramblings are annoying. I dont care what you think!!
    I also dont expect you to understand anything because these issues are beyond your comprehension.

  • Avatar
    Liquidmicro
    June 23, 2008 at 9:52 am

    What’s the matter, Evelyn? Did I use your beloved NIF against you, to show you that you are, again, only partially correct? To show how you call everybody else liars and vile names, yet you yourself are just ignorant to all the facts and facets. Don’t let your feeble mind go to waist, use this information to get a good education in here. You should be thankful we are willing to teach you and show you the full picture.

  • Avatar
    Frank
    June 23, 2008 at 3:29 pm

    Liquid, her ramblings remind me a lot of the ramblings of another blog owner that you and I frequent. They seem to have a brick between their two ears.

  • Avatar
    Liquidmicro
    June 23, 2008 at 5:35 pm

    Again you fail to complete your paragraph. Your own link works against you. Here is the ending of your own paragraph:
    “Criminal violations of the INA, on the other hand, include felonies and misdemeanors and are prosecuted in federal district courts. These types of violations include the bringing in and harboring of certain undocumented aliens (INA §274), the illegal entry of aliens (INA §275), and the reentry of aliens previously excluded or deported (INA
    §276).34”
    Now, did you actually take the time to read the links 32, 33, & 34? I’m betting you didn’t. Because if you did, you wouldn’t look so foolish. If you don’t respond to my posts, I don’t really care, however, your false presumptions and calling others liars just shows your lack of knowledge and ignorance of the actual facts.
    And for you Laura, “if someone is wearing an orange jumpsuit and has been shackled, they must be a criminal”, that usually is the case, stop by any local courthouse to find that your statement is actually true.

  • Avatar
    Evelyn
    June 23, 2008 at 7:46 pm

    “They seem to have a brick between their two ears.”
    So that’s what you think of people who refuse to go along with your BS racist agenda. LOL!
    The brick is in your face. That is what you keep running into when you try to promote the lies, hate, dehumanization, bigotry, and racism you hold so close to your heart and are willing to give your life defending. At least that’s what you say at the other blog you frequent.

  • Avatar
    Liquidmicro
    June 23, 2008 at 9:31 pm

    “Racist, kkker, Republikkkan, Nativist, Liar, hater, bigot, etc., etc., etc.”
    That’s what you think of those that don’t go along with your BS racist agenda.
    What makes you think you are any better than anybody else? Your abrupt and ignorant fallacies are what are holding you back. take the time to learn from others in here, put it all together, you might get the whole picture, however knowing your comprehension skill and ignorance combined, you would never make it any further than where you are.
    Your fight is no more righteous than anybody else’s, yet you condemn quicker than you learn.
    At least Dee, can make a semi co-herent argument and show a case for her basis, no Frank, Evelyn is nothing, it’s not a brick between her ears, its her own pride and foolishness!

  • Avatar
    Grandma
    June 23, 2008 at 10:11 pm

    A few miles of Texas border use this program, California and New Mexico dont use it at all.
    You’re not as informed as you say, Evelyn, because New Mexico does use this program.

  • Avatar
    Evelyn
    June 24, 2008 at 1:45 am

    “if someone is wearing an orange jumpsuit and has been shackled, they must be a criminal”, that usually is the case, stop by any local courthouse to find that your statement is actually true.”
    Well yeah dang just hang um. Who the heck cares if he goes to court and is found !!!NOT GUILTY!!! Heck he’s wearin a orange jumpsuit anyway. Damn criminal! LOL!

  • Avatar
    Frank
    June 24, 2008 at 8:26 am

    One must have a brick between their ears when undisputable facts are presented to them such as Liquid has about our criminal justice system above and one is still in denial over it.
    I merely want our immigration laws respected and enforced just as any law abiding American does. That doesn’t make me a bigot, racist, liar or an uncompassionate person. We cannot take in the whole world’s poor so why should we make an exception for those who came here illegally? Are they special?

  • Avatar
    Liquidmicro
    June 24, 2008 at 4:21 pm

    Again, Evelyn, we are talking of “Illegal Immigrants” that have been caught and are detained. So, yes, if they are wearing an ‘orange jumpsuit’ and are ‘shackled and handcuffed’ then they are found to be “CRIMINALS” simply because of there status. Don’t obfuscate them with citizens, which have the right to ‘Due Process’.
    Your ignorance is beyond stupidity now. I have to reply to you as a child just so you can understand the facts and how our Laws and Legal System actually work. If you don’t agree with the system, get the laws changed, however, we know ‘your’ tactic, you prefer to attack the character of the poster vs attacking the law. Then you wonder why you look so foolish, laughing just makes you that much more ignorant.

  • Avatar
    Grandma
    June 24, 2008 at 6:47 pm

    Evelyn quoted:
    The INA includes both criminal and civil components, providing both for
    criminal charges (e.g., alien smuggling, which is prosecuted in the federal courts) and
    for civil violations (e.g., lack of legal status, which may lead to removal through a
    separate administrative system in the Department of Justice).32 Being illegally
    present in the U.S. has always been a civil, not criminal, violation of the INA, and
    subsequent deportation and associated administrative processes are civil
    proceedings.33 For instance, a lawfully admitted nonimmigrant alien may become
    deportable if his visitor’s visa expires or if his student status changes. CRIMINAL VIOLATION OF THE INA, ON THE OTHER HAND, INCLUDE FELONIES AND MISDEMEANORS AND ARE PROSECUTED IN FEDERAL DISTRICT COURTS.”
    This is correct. So if a district decides on a policy such as Operation Streamline such as Texas and Arizona or in New Mexico called Operation Swift Justice, the district can decide to charge illegal entry in a criminal court (as a misdemeanor) instead of giving the illegal a voluntary return to Mexico (which was the policy a while back) or go before an immigration Judge for deportation (which was also the policy a while back). Some districts on the border continue to allow illegals to return without any criminal charges but more and more border districts are now charging them with criminal charges before they are deported.

  • Avatar
    Evelyn
    June 24, 2008 at 8:08 pm

    Liquid
    Dee just has a nicer way of telling you the same thing I do which is based on facts. I dont beat around the bush so as not to offend you. I dont like racism and I think those who practice racism and use lies to further their racist agenda should be given no mercy when being shown the truth.
    Dee probably gets her facts from reality. Just like I do. What is REALLY going on in the world. You get your facts from the LIES Tanton and his cohorts have used to smear Hispanics. You are being used by people who are racists. Letting yourself be used this way also makes you racist.
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    No matter how much spinning you, Liquid and Horace do in the interpretation of Immigration Law, it does not change facts. No truth in the myth that if you repeat something (without evidence) over and over it will become true.
    You seem to think I do all this for your benefit. WRONG! I dont give a rats ass what you think or feel or say. It is done for the benefit of exposing your lies. The American people get it and that is what I care about.
    Oh, did you hear the good news, Obama is leading in all the polls. That means CIR soon! LOL!
    After all your dirt has come out in the wash the American people have left you and your ilk standing out in the COLD. You’ve been exposed.

  • Avatar
    Horace
    June 24, 2008 at 10:14 pm

    “Oh, did you hear the good news, Obama is leading in all the polls. That means CIR soon! LOL!”
    Bush was for CIR, and see how far it got. As far as the American people caring about invading illegal aliens, they hate the idea, and dislike the additional hundreds of thousands of rapists, DUI and other criminals that enter illegally along with the others. Opposition is demonstrated every day, as the states do what the federal government refuses to do. The fact that the last marches failed, garnering absolutely no new public support speaks volumes on how people feel about illegal immigrants. CIR is just another name for amnesty. Amnesties have been proven to encourage new waves of illegals. Once more you’ll be back and demanding another amnesty and we’ll have to listen to your ugly rants again. You Hispanics risk losing a great deal of good will from the rest of the nation if your gamble fails to pay off. I hope that it’s worth the risk.

  • Avatar
    Liquidmicro
    June 24, 2008 at 10:15 pm

    Anything ‘factually’ you have stated at any given time, has only been mere opinion. When you have attempted to post any facts at all you always leave off the most telling parts. Get your facts straight!! Your version of the discussion above, where you always left out the ‘facts’, shows your own habitual lies.
    CIR once Obama is elected?? What about CIR once McCain is elected?? Learn how the Government operates, the President can not demand CIR, only Congress can do anything, and with the factions we have in their now, it ain’t gonna happen anytime soon. Look to all the bills already going through that are funding ICE, and all this by a Democratic lead Congress. However, time will tell, won’t it.
    Whether you think your exposing ‘my lies’ is a fallacy. I have used your own links to point out my points and your own shortcomings. I have used your own evidence to make and show my factual statements. Nothing need to be repeated when it is clearly stated.
    As for Dee, she doesn’t argue with ‘facts’ she argues based on her humanitarianism, same as you. Your version of the truth is nothing more then just that, your version. However, your version has been shown not to be substantiated when it comes to the laws governing the US of A.
    Nothing in here that I have posted, nor have linked to was from Tanton or a Tanton Organization. I have always used your ‘credible’ links, the URLs you usually plagiarize from.
    You so quickly forget, I am not a Republican, nor an Independent.
    “I dont like racism and I think those who practice racism and use lies to further their racist agenda should be given no mercy when being shown the truth.”
    I feel the same way, thats why I ‘educated you’ about our “Immigration Laws” and showed you the ‘truth’ that you still refuse to except. There is nothing in my posts above that showed racism in any way. All I did was expose your lies and clarify your own mis-informed statements!
    I like this statement, I think I will make it as a signature from now on, I will of course give all the credit to you.
    “Now that you have made a total fool of yourself let me give you some advice. Before you post evidence make sure you are not blowing a hole in your own Azz. OUCH! LMFAO!”

  • Avatar
    Evelyn
    June 25, 2008 at 3:21 am

    Grandma
    Yes I agree, if other crimes are comitted once the person of illegal status is inside the U.S. they can be charged as a criminal. If a person of illegal status crosses the border at certain places AND THEY ARE CAUGHT they can be charged with a misdemeanor. This is only a pilot program for small sections of the border. Most of the border operates as usual.
    The fact still remains that persons in the U.S. who are of Illegal status are not considered criminals.
    civil violations (e.g., lack of legal status, which may lead to removal through a
    separate administrative system in the Department of Justice).32 Being illegally
    present in the U.S. has always been a civil, not criminal, violation of the INA, and
    subsequent deportation and associated administrative processes are civil proceedings
    The only way these persons of illegal status could be charged as criminals is if they committed a criminal violation in addition to the civil violation.

  • Avatar
    Evelyn
    June 25, 2008 at 3:21 am

    Grandma
    Yes I agree, if other crimes are comitted once the person of illegal status is inside the U.S. they can be charged as a criminal. If a person of illegal status crosses the border at certain places AND THEY ARE CAUGHT they can be charged with a misdemeanor. This is only a pilot program for small sections of the border. Most of the border operates as usual.
    The fact still remains that persons in the U.S. who are of Illegal status are not considered criminals.
    civil violations (e.g., lack of legal status, which may lead to removal through a
    separate administrative system in the Department of Justice).32 Being illegally
    present in the U.S. has always been a civil, not criminal, violation of the INA, and
    subsequent deportation and associated administrative processes are civil proceedings
    The only way these persons of illegal status could be charged as criminals is if they committed a criminal violation in addition to the civil violation.

  • Avatar
    Evelyn
    June 25, 2008 at 2:20 pm

    Liquid
    Facts dont change because you ramble about other issues, change scenarios, use different words to describe the same thing, refocus to inform on another subject not pertaining to the one at hand, misinform, leave out information, or add information about how you perceive reality.
    That is what you do . That is why I dont answer you. Most of your posts are gibberish. You still dont fool anyone.

  • Avatar
    Horace
    June 28, 2008 at 8:58 pm

    “The fact still remains that persons in the U.S. who are of Illegal status are not considered criminals.”
    Even if it were true, the fact is that our laws permit them to be arrested, incarcerated and deported, all with little ceremony. I’d have to say that your point is moot, evelyn, as the outcome is the same. If punishment is an expression of how we view an offence, then the people of this country take illegal immigration as a serious offense, indeed. Call them elves if it suits you, but you’re only deceiving yourself if you think that it will make a difference.

  • Avatar
    Evelyn
    July 3, 2008 at 6:37 pm

    NO! You call them criminals because they are in this country without proper documentation.
    They are not criminals for being in this country without proper documentation.
    Unlike your ancestors who came to murder and steal land that wasnt theirs, the majority of today’s immigrants come to work.

  • Avatar
    Liquidmicro
    July 3, 2008 at 9:49 pm

    Here it is directly from the US Department of Justice, a much better source of recognized factual information:
    Criminal Resource Manual 1918 Arrest of Illegal Aliens by State and Local Officers
    Subsection 1324(c) of Title 8 specifically authorizes state and local officers “whose duty it is to enforce criminal laws” to make arrests for violations of 8 U.S.C. § 1324. There is also a general federal statute which authorizes certain local officials to make arrests for violations of federal statutes, 18 U.S.C. § 3041. The Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals has held that 18 U.S.C. § 3041 authorizes those local officials to issue process for the arrest, to be executed by law enforcement officers. See United States v. Bowdach, 561 F.2d 1160, 1168 (5th Cir. 1977).
    Rule 4(a)(1) of the Federal Rules of Criminal Procedure provides that an arrest warrant “shall be executed by a marshal or by some other officer authorized by law.” The phrase, “some other officer,” includes state and local officers. Bowdach, supra.
    Section 439 of the Antiterrorism and Effective Death Penalty Act of 1996 added a new 8 U.S.C. § 1252c which provides that notwithstanding any other provision of law, to the extent permitted by relevant State and local law, State and local law enforcement officials are authorized to arrest and detain an individual who (1) is an alien illegally present in the United States; and (2) has previously been convicted of a felony in the United States and deported and left the United States after such conviction, but only after the State or local law enforcement officials obtain appropriate confirmation from the Immigration and Naturalization Service of the status of such individual and only for such period of time as may be required for the Service to take the individual into federal custody for purposes of deporting or removing the alien from the United States.
    In the absence of a specific federal statute, the validity of an arrest without a warrant for violation of federal law by local peace officers is to be determined by reference to local law. See Miller v. United States, 357 U.S. 301, 305 (1958); United States v. Di Re, 332 U.S. 581, 589 (1948).
    In approving a state trooper’s arrest of persons who appeared to be illegal aliens, the United States Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit held, simply, as follows: “A state trooper has general investigative authority to inquire into possible immigration violations.” See United States v. Salinas-Calderon, 728 F.2d 1298, 1301, n. 3 (10th Cir. 1984).
    The United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit held, in Gonzales v. City of Peoria, 722 F.2d 468 (9th Cir. 1983), that the structure of the Immigration and Nationality Act does not evidence an intent to preclude local enforcement of the act’s criminal provisions. Id. at 474. Based on the pertinent legislative history, the court of appeals rejected the argument that since 8 U.S.C. § 1324(c) specifically authorizes local officers to make arrests for violations of 8 U.S.C. § 1324(a), and 8 U.S.C. §§ 1325(a) and 1326 contain no comparable provision, Congress must have intended that local officers be precluded from making arrests for violations of 8 U.S.C. §§ 1325(a) and 1326. Id. at 475. The decision warns, however, that the first violation of 8 U.S.C. § 1325(a) is a misdemeanor, and that if applicable state law authorizes law enforcement officers to arrest for misdemeanors only if committed in their presence, they would not be authorized to arrest aliens for illegal entry (unless the officers should happen to know that the alien had previously been convicted of illegal entry) unless they saw him/her cross the border.
    The disappointing aspect of Gonzales is the statement that an alien’s “inability to produce documentation does not in itself provide probable cause (to arrest).” See Gonzales v. City of Peoria, supra, at 16. Pursuant to 8 U.S.C. § 1304(e), aliens are issued registration cards and must carry such cards with them at all times. Aliens who gain entry without the requisite inspection, and who therefore are not issued such cards, violate 8 U.S.C. § 1325. Consequently, a law enforcement officer confronting an alien who is unable to produce documentation arguably has probable cause to believe that a violation of 8 U.S.C. § 1304(e) (failure to possess documents or 8 U.S.C. § 1325(a) (entry without inspection) has occurred. (If the alien is undocumented and has been in the United States for longer than 30 days, he or she has also violated 8 U.S.C. § 1306(a)).
    http://www.usdoj.gov/usao/eousa/foia_reading_room/usam/title9/crm01918.htm
    I see something about not carrying an I-94 form with them at all times a problem along with failure to register and entry without inspection.
    A misdemeanor, or misdemeanour, in many common law legal systems, is a “lesser” criminal act. Misdemeanors are generally punished less severely than felonies, but theoretically more so than administrative infractions (also known as regulatory offenses). Many misdemeanors are punished with monetary fines. Usually only repeat misdemeanor offenders are punished by actual jail time.
    In the United States, the federal government generally considers a crime punishable by a year or less in prison to be a misdemeanor.[1] All other crimes are felonies.

    In the United States, misdemeanors are crimes with a maximum punishment of 12 months of incarceration, typically in a local jail (again, as contrasted with felons, who are typically incarcerated in a prison). Those people who are convicted of misdemeanors are often punished with probation, community service or part-time imprisonment, served on the weekends.
    Something about that “misdemeanors are crimes” that makes them “criminals” and thusly named “Illegal Immigrants”.

  • Avatar
    Alex
    July 4, 2008 at 11:11 pm

    There was an article, first page, in USA Today last week, it read something that hispanic polulation was growing, not because of immigration but by birth rate. Grandma. Liquid, Horace, Frank might be eating their bones. What are you going to propose now? A Law for mandatory sterilization of all hispanics?, Forced abortion? What are your wicked minds planning to do?

  • Avatar
    Evelyn Chavez
    August 9, 2008 at 2:27 am

    Poor Poor Liquid cant understand what he reads. Here is another prospective.
    Are Illegal Immigrants Criminals? Not!
    by Ken Schoolland, Posted July 15, 2005
    I hear it from some of the nicest people one would ever meet. Some dear friends of mine, whom I respect very much, say that all illegal immigrants are criminals because they broke the laws that control who may come into this country. And since these immigrants are criminals, we don’t want that kind of person here.
    Such accusations confuse what is legal with what is moral. American history is filled with people who broke unjust laws and were morally justified in doing so.
    The American Revolution was fought by men and women who broke the laws of England and of King George III. Had they been arrested, they would have been hanged for treason to the Crown. If breaking the law makes one a criminal, then the Founding Fathers were all criminals. But no one still believes that today.
    Dred Scott and thousands of other slaves defied the Fugitive Slave Act and ran away, “stealing themselves” from Southern plantation masters in the early and mid 1800s. Those who were arrested were returned to their slave “owners,” and anyone found trying to help them escape to Canada was prosecuted as well.
    Many juries exercised jury nullification. Declaring that the law was unjust, juries often refused to convict participants in the Underground Railroad. No one today would claim that a runaway slave was a criminal.
    In the 1930s there were hundreds of Jews who came to American shores aboard the SS St. Louis, forcibly rejected under the guise of immigration quotas, many of whom ultimately perished in Hitler’s concentration camps. Countless potential immigrants watched in desperate disappointment.
    But suppose those passengers had defied immigration law and jumped ship in Miami harbor. Would anyone today call them criminals? I think not. Indeed, those who returned Jews to their persecutors might be considered guilty of collaborating with villainy — albeit legal villainy.
    Treasures of the earth
    It may be illegal for people to seek freedom and opportunity in this country, but it isn’t immoral. I admire the courage of immigrants who leave all that is familiar to them, risking life and limb on stormy seas and deadly deserts, in order to move to a strange land where everything is unfamiliar and potentially hostile.
    Most of our ancestors moved for freedom and opportunity, and we are the beneficiaries. Thank God they weren’t arrested and sent packing, as were violators of the Chinese Exclusion Act. Indeed, we might wonder whether we could have mustered the same measure of courage if we had been in their shoes.
    In the first case, many immigrants are great entrepreneurs who offer jobs to Americans. Other immigrants take jobs, but they never “take” jobs that are not willingly offered to them by eager employers.
    I often ask audiences, “Suppose you are an employer and you know only one thing about two job applicants in front of you: one is native-born and the other is an immigrant. Whom would you expect to be the harder worker?” Audiences overwhelmingly favor the immigrant. Why? Americans are surely good workers. But the very act of migration is seen as proof of vigor, ambition, determination, and courageous self-reliance.
    Americans have a moral right to make these choices for themselves — as employees and as employers. Says Robert W. Tracinski, a senior writer for the Ayn Rand Institute,
    The irrational premise behind our nation’s immigration laws is that a native-born American has a “right” to a particular job, not because he has earned it, but because he was born here. To this “right,” the law sacrifices the employer’s right to hire the best employees — and the immigrant’s right to take a job that he deserves. To put it succinctly, initiative and productiveness are sacrificed to sloth and inertia.
    The “American dream” is essentially the freedom of each individual to rise as far as his abilities take him. The opponents of immigration, however, want to repudiate that vision by turning America into a privileged preserve for those who want the law to set aside jobs for them — jobs they cannot freely earn through their own efforts…. Any immigrant who wants to come to America in search of a better life should be let in — and any employer who wants to hire him should be free to do so.
    To the legalist, however, who places law above moral right, the employer who hires as he pleases is a criminal. The legalist wants stricter penalties against employers who defy state mandates on hiring. He fails to see that violations of certain laws can be illegal but not immoral.
    Welfare magnet?
    But what of the immigrant who takes welfare? Isn’t this a burden on society that must be stopped?
    Yes, it is. But politically powerless newcomers are no more responsible for the welfare system in this country than they are responsible for the tyranny and corruption in the country that they are fleeing. Okay, stop the flow of welfare, but at the same time remove the plethora of (anti-)labor laws that make it difficult for newcomers to be hired.
    It is wrong to assume that most immigrants come to America to get on the welfare gravy train. If this were true, then immigrants would be moving away from states with the lowest welfare and into states with the highest welfare.
    My research (The Journal of Private Enterprise, spring 2004) demonstrates that the opposite is true. In overwhelming numbers, both the native-born population and the foreign-born population through the decade of the 1990s moved away from states with the highest welfare and into states with the lowest welfare. While there are some high-profile exceptions, most immigrants seek opportunity, not welfare.
    The brilliant economist Julian Simon demonstrated that immigrants are a great source of productivity and economic growth. They always have been.
    Moral principles
    Governments do not decide morality. Governments behave morally when upholding moral action and behave immorally when suppressing moral action. Morality is based on principles far more constant and profound than the variant whims of majority votes.
    The people who understood this best were those rebels who defied the law of the day to pen these words:
    We hold these Truths to be self-evident, that all Men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Happiness.
    To George Washington this meant,
    The bosom of America is open to receive not only the opulent and respectable stranger, but the oppressed and persecuted of all nations and religions, whom we should welcome to a participation of all our rights and privileges.
    Ken Schoolland is an associate professor of economics and political science at Hawaii Pacific University and a member of the board of directors for the International Society for Individual Liberty

  • Avatar
    Liquidmicro
    August 9, 2008 at 4:14 pm

    As usual Evelyn, you confuse even yourself. Your version of morals have nothing to do with the law, even the UN Constitution and Bill of Rights agrees more with me and my views. Try looking into Ethics instead of morals.
    You must really be bored today if you are trying to re-ignite arguments from over a month ago. I thought maybe you learned something between then and now, obviously I am mistaken for thinking that.

  • Avatar
    Liquidmicro
    August 10, 2008 at 9:54 pm

    The Moral Law is based on the premise that there is such a thing as right and wrong, and there are some things that you “ought” to do, and some things that you “ought not” to do. I think that everyone believes in a moral law. Even those who say they don’t, still get upset when their house is burgled. The question really becomes how to definitively tell that something is right or wrong.
    Most people normally use their own feelings as their measuring stick. The principle of justice is all about fairness. A few people might argue that illegals have a right to be here because they are just seeking social justice. Others would argue that social justice has its limitations and that the illegal crossing of the border of a sovereign country would not be justified by the pursuit of higher paying jobs. Mexico is not repressive toward its citizens, so it is not as though the illegal aliens are seeking political sanctuary.
    A related ethical question is whether illegal entry is fair to existing citizens and also to those trying to enter the country through appropriate channels. Foreign nationals who are attempting to follow the legal process for entering the United States don’t think the illegal border crossings are fair to them. They are trying to play by the rules, but are losing out to those who are breaking the law.
    As long as business is not held accountable for aiding and abetting illegal acts, the ethical problem will continue and U.S. society will pay the costs and continue the downward spiral of moral relativism. If illegal immigration continues unchecked, lawlessness and disregard for the rule of law might spread to other sectors as well.

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