Guest Voz articles

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Guest Voz: Beyond Stop and Frisk: Communities Organize for Deeper Reforms

Guest Voz: Beyond Stop and Frisk: Communities Organize for Deeper Reforms

By Kenyon Farrow RH Reality Check On August 22, the New York City Council voted to override Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s veto of the Community Safety Act, which is composed of two bills seeking to create more levels of accountability within the New York Police Department (NYPD) and prevent discriminatory practices, such as stop-and-frisk activity, from

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Guest Voz: Militarizing U.S.-Mexico border blocks more than just immigrants. It blocks the nation’s memory.

By José de la Isla Hispanic Link News Service WASHINGTON, D.C. — Violent nature, like a gathering storm, knows no borders. Hurricane Katrina was like that. It made landfall eight years ago, Aug. 23, 2005 over the Bahamas bringing flooding and deaths before crossing the Atlantic as a Category 1 hurricane over southern Florida, then

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Guest Voz: Defining Chicano identity means knowing the Mexican past within the context of U.S. history

By Rodolfo F. Acuña LatinaLista For the past forty plus years, the question of Chicana/ identity has evoked passionate discussion. It got one of my favorite Chicano scholars, the late Dr. Ramón Ruiz, into hot water. Don Ramón, for those of you who did not know him, was one of a kind and always spoke

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Guest Voz: Annual gathering of Latina academics explore the ever-changing roles of Hispanic women

By Veronica I. Arreola LatinaLista Columbus, Ohio is not the first place you would guess for an academic gathering focused on Chicana/Latina and Native American women studies with a feminist heart. But last week it was! The MALCS 2013 Summer Institute is an annual gathering of Chicana and Native American scholars. This was my first

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Guest Voz: Breathing In Our Dead and The Spirit of Immigration Reform

By Roberto Lovato Presente.org Of all our senses, the one that can most alter U.S. immigration history–and U.S. history itself–is our sense of smell. If we could, for example, magically bring the smell in the freezers of the Pima County Medical Examiner’s office to politicians, advocates and voters on either side of the immigration debate,

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